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published Sep 14, 2020

Equestrian Etiquette - Protecting Trees and Park Structures

by Lora Goerlich

Responsible equestrians should actively protect trees and other park structures when out on the trail. Equine expert Lora Goerlich gives her take on this topic.


published Jun 15, 2020

NWTS Best Management Practices

Best Management Practice Goal: The water trail actively engages local communities and trail users, who provide support and advocacy for the maintenance and stewardship of the water trail.


published Feb 1, 2020

Rail Trail Development: A Best Practices Report

This report focuses on the issues surrounding the proposed development of the Palouse to Cascades Rail-Trail.


published Dec 30, 2019

Visitor and Trail Management Skills and Competencies

by American Trails Staff

Specific skills used in management of trails and greenways: facility management; urban trail and bike/ped management; visitor management.


published Nov 7, 2019

Safe Encounters with Horses on Shared-Use Trails

by Dianne Martin

American Trails contributor Dianne Martin shares some tips on how to safely share trails with horses.


published Aug 14, 2019

6 Solutions for Managing Multi-Use Trails and Conflict

by Taylor Goodrich with American Trails

Let’s face it. Motorized, equestrian, biking, and hiking users do not always get along. When conflicts inevitably arise, what do we do, and how can we avoid it in the first place?


published Jul 1, 2019

DCR Trails Guidelines and Best Practices Manual

by Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation

The DCR’s Trails Program seeks to provide a safe, quality recreation experience for a diverse range of trail users while practicing sound stewardship of the Commonwealth’s natural and cultural resources. This “Trails Guidelines and Best Practices Manual” meets this responsibility by providing a consistent set of trail management policies, guidelines, procedures, and best practices in sustainable trail development.


published Jan 24, 2019

Mountain Biker Attitudes and Perceptions of eMTBs (electric‐mountain bikes)

This study found that were many misconceptions about what constitutes an eMTB. These misconceptions seem to foster fears and concerns about trail conflict, access, and the morality of individuals using eMTBs.


published Oct 16, 2018

Prison Hill Recreation Area OHV Management Plan

by Carson City Parks, Recreation & Open Space

The purpose of the Prison Hill Recreation Area Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Management Plan is to provide the framework to proactively manage the approximately 960 acres open to OHV use by outlining a prescribed set of management activities. The plan will be implemented through a phased approach.


published Sep 17, 2018

FAQ: Determining trail capacity or level of service

by American Trails Staff

How many users can a paved trail support before it becomes too crowded or over used?


published May 1, 2018

Best Practices for Trail Management

by Maricopa County Parks and Recreation

Maricopa County (AZ) has put together a comprehensive guide to best practices in trail planning, construction, and maintenance. The 99-page guide includes Planning Objectives for a variety of trail types, motorized as well as nonmotorized. Barrier-free trails are also discussed, along with vegetation management, signs and wayfinding, and many more details of trail development and sustainable maintenance.


published Jul 1, 2017

Unpaved Non-Motorized Trail Guidelines

by Florida Office of Greenways and Trails

We all know a good trail when we’re on one. We’re not disoriented due to lack of signage or markers. We’re not climbing over downed trees or ducking under branches, and we’re not slogging through water or mud unless we’ve been forewarned beforehand. A good trail is one where we can fully enjoy our surroundings while challenging ourselves if that is our intent. Trails should provide for a variety of trail distances, loops, ecosystems, scenery and degrees of difficulty. As trail professionals, we should strive to make the best possible experience for users and learn from the past.