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published Jul 1, 2016

Management Factors to Consider Regarding Concurrent Fat Tire Bicycle Use on Groomed Snowmobile Trails

by American Council of Snowmobile Assns. (ACSA)

All recreational trail use, whether motorized or nonmotorized, requires active management. Trail management should ensure adherence to private or public land use prescriptions, adequate resource protection, and that appropriate visitor experiences are provided. Trail management policies should be set at the local level to ensure they best fit local circumstances.


published Feb 16, 2016

The Emergence of “Fat Bikes” in the USA; Trends, potential consequences and management implications

In the USA, sales and use of “fat bikes” (bicycles with 75–120 mm-wide tires) have increased dramatically in the past five years. These bikes are designed to open new terrain to cyclists, including snow-covered trails and softer ground surfaces impossible to ride with a standard mountain bike. In this paper, we discuss the extent and possible trends of fat bike use, potential impacts, conflicts and land management approaches.


published Aug 1, 2015

Exercise Intensity and Performance Aspects of Snow Biking through the Use of a Fat Bike

In recent years, fat bikes have become a popular option for mountain bikers. A fat bike is a mountain bike equipped with tires ranging from 9.3 – 10.1 cm wide, twice as wide as a traditional mountain bike tire (Barber, 2014). This allows them to be ridden at an inflation pressure as low as 27579 Pascal (4 PSI). The wide surface area, and low inflation pressure, of these tires allows for excellent handling of the bicycle while riding over sand, mud, and snow. It is difficult, if not impossible, for a traditional mountain bike to ride over such surfaces.


published Sep 1, 2014

Facts and Myths About Snowmobiling and Winter Trails

by American Council of Snowmobile Assns. (ACSA)

Did you know that the majority of the 135,0000 miles of snowmobile trails are open for multiple use? Read about the facts and myths of multiple use winter recreation!


published Sep 1, 2011

Ski Trail Grooming Guide

by NWT Recreation and Parks Assn.

NWT communties are connected by countless numbers of trails, though few of them are dedicated ski trails. With a little work, some equipment and know-how, ski doo trails, walking trails, cutlines, riverbeds, fields and lakes can be turned into quality ski trails. And it’s well worth the effort. Groomed and tracked ski trails are easier to ski on, easier to learn on, better to race on and a whole lot faster than bush trails. Groomed trails turn skiing into skiing!


published Mar 10, 2003

Views on Nordic Ski Trail Easements and Property Values

The Crested Butte Nordic Council is developing a system of skiing trails in cooperation with private landowners that will connect towns and developments throughout the upper valley.


published Apr 1, 2001

How Methow Valley Grew an Economy

While developers and government officials spent two decades and millions of dollars trying to turn this valley into a destination downhill ski resort, residents quietly built and maintained a world-class cross-country skiing area.


Jan 17, 2017

Huts for Hiking, Skiing, and Biking: Why, Where, and How?

An overview of hut systems in USA and around the world, which includes a wide range of accommodations systems such as shelters, yurts, platform tents, inns and B&B's, hostels, and mountain huts of every size and kind.