Trail-Specific Recommended Resources

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published Jul 21, 2010

A Cross-Sectional Examination of the Physical Fitness and Selected Health Attributes of Recreational All-Terrain Vehicle Riders and Off-Road Motorcyclists

This study found that habitual off-road vehicle riders had physiological characteristics that were equivalent, or slightly superior, to members of the general population on important fitness and health variables.


published Aug 30, 2012

A Snapshot of the Economic Impact of Outdoor Recreation

Outdoor recreation spending in Western states equaled $255.6 billion – nearly 40% of the national total. This includes purchases of outdoor gear and vehicles as well as travel expenditures when enjoying the great Western outdoors.


published Jan 1, 2006

Adventure Tourism Park and OHV Trail System Plan

A plan for a series of unique trail systems developed in Knott County, Kentucky. The System includes trails and horseback riding, ATV’s, elk/wildlife viewing, hiking, walking and mountain biking always keeping in mind the three major priorities: safety, protecting the environment, and developing a multiple use trail system in which the trails do not conflict.


published May 5, 2011

ATV Trail Management

by Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Parks and Trails Division

A slideshow presentation of ATV trail management guidelines.


published Jan 1, 2019

Backcountry Discovery Routes® and Tourism: How Adventure Motorcyclists Can Help Your Community

In 2017, BDR routes generated $17.3 million in new tourism expenditures, with the average traveling party spending $3,769 on their BDR trip.


published Jul 1, 1998

Cattle Guards for Off-Highway Vehicle Trails

by USDA Forest Service

One of the greatest sources of contention between recreationists and livestock permittees as trail use increases is gates.


published Jun 9, 2018

Colorado State Parks Motorized Vehicle Trail Use Guidelines

by Colorado Parks and Wildlife - OHV Program

Safety considerations and trail use guidelines for OHV recreation


published Aug 18, 2008

Economic Benefits of the Hatfield-McCoy Trail System

by Karen Umphress with UP! Outside

An interview with Bill Reed, Marketing Specialist for the Hatfield-McCoy Regional Recreation Authority.


published Jan 1, 2016

Economic Contribution of Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation in Colorado

During the 2014–2015 season, motorized recreational enthusiasts spent an estimated $1.6 billion while taking trips using motorized vehicles for recreational purposes. More than 92 percent of these expenditures occurred during the summer recreational season. In addition to spending money on trips, households that participate in motorized recreation also spend money on maintenance, repairs, accessories, vehicle storage, and miscellaneous items associated with their vehicles. Motorized recreational enthusiasts spent more than an estimated $724 million annually on various items to support and enhance their experiences in Colorado, including $163 million in new vehicle purchases. In total, motorized recreational enthusiasts were responsible for $2.3 billion in direct expenditures related to motorized recreation in Colorado during the 2014–2015 season.


published Jan 1, 2019

Economic Impact of Off-Highway Recreation in the State of Arizona

by Arizona State University

From 2016 to 2017 Arizona State University conducted a study to measure the economic impact of OHV recreation, by retained and out of state visitors, on the State of Arizona.


published Jan 15, 2009

Economic Impacts and Motivations of Off-Highway Vehicle Recreationists

This Florida case study surveys the economic impacts, motivations, and travel and equipment expenditures of OHV recreationists.


published Jan 1, 2015

Economic Importance of Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation: An Analysis of Idaho Counties

During the period August 2012 through November 2012, the University of Idaho, in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation (IDPR), surveyed Idaho’s registered off-highway-vehicle (OHV) owners. The goal of the survey was to determine the economic importance of OHV use in Idaho during the previous 12 months. The survey sample was drawn from IDPR-registered OHV owners. OHV activities not related to recreation (e.g., work) and out-of-state visitors could not be sampled. Trips and expenditures for OHV recreation in Idaho would be higher if nonresident OHV recreation could be estimated.