Preserving our Nation's Historic Trails

Trail Turtles, Rut Nuts, Contractors and Bureaucrats

This panel presentation describes the cooperative efforts of a trail mix of organization volunteers, contractors, and agencies, including the latest processes and techniques used in protecting and preserving the crown jewels of the National Trails System.

Speakers: Gary Werner, Executive Director, Partnership for the National Trails System; Cheryl Blanchard, Archaeologist, U.S. Bureau of Land Management; Dave Welch, Preservation Officer, Oregon-California Trails Association; Gary Long, OTAK, Inc.

This panel presentation describes the cooperative efforts of a trail mix of organization volunteers, contractors, and agencies, including the latest processes and techniques used in protecting and preserving the crown jewels of the National Trails System - renowned congressionally designated national historic trails such as the Oregon Trail, California Trail, and the Juan Bautista de Anza. How does one protect thousands of miles of pristine trail landscape, while demands for communication towers, energy development, and other uses escalate? Learn about mapping, marking, and monitoring, classifying historic trails, documenting historic integrity, determining historic settings, applying viewshed analyses, and using visual simulation to hide modern intrusions.

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Don Meeker, president of Terrabilt, reflects on trails as a critical sanctuary during COVID-19, and provides guidance on signage to keep everyone on trails safe. Terrabilt will also provide the production artwork for their COVID-19 trail sign for free.

The Economic Benefits of Mountain Biking at One of Its Meccas: An Application of the Travel Cost Method to Mountain Biking in Moab, Utah

This 1997 paper estimates the value of a relatively new form of recreation: mountain biking. Its popularity has resulted in many documented conflicts, and its value must be estimated so an informed decision regarding trail allocation can be made. A travel cost model (TCM) is used to estimate the economic benefits, measured by consumer surplus, to the users of mountain bike trails near Moab, Utah.