filed under: federal legislation


Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails Comprehensive Management and Use Plan / Final Environmental Impact Statement

This Comprehensive Management and Use Plan / Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails is shaped, in part, by the planning requirements found in section 5(f) of the National Trails System Act. It focuses on the trails’ purpose and significance, issues and concerns related to current conditions along the trails, resource protection, visitor experience and use, and long-term administrative and management objectives. Elements of the proposed plan have been developed in cooperation with federal, state, and local agencies, as well as nonprofit trails organizations — the entities that form the core of any partnership for national historic trails.

by National Park Service


Comprehensive Management Plan 508


The purpose of this document is to develop a comprehensive management and use plan for the California and the Pony Express National Historic Trails. This document also updates the 1981 Comprehensive Management and Use Plans for the Oregon and Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trails. Map 1 shows the congressionally authorized routes of the four trails.

The need for the plan is to comply with the requirements of the National Trails System Act, and to address management issues and concerns related to administration and management, resource protection, interpretation and visitor experience, uses of the national historic trails, and site development and marking. (The specific issues are further described beginning on page 26.)

This Comprehensive Management and Use Plan / Final Environmental Impact Statement is shaped, in part, by the planning requirements found in section 5(f) of the National Trails System Act (see appendix A). It focuses on the trails’ purpose and significance, resource protection, visitor experience and use, and long-term administrative objectives. Elements of the proposed plan have been developed in cooperation with federal, state, and local agencies, as well as various nonprofit trail organizations — the entities that form the core of any partner ship for national historic trails.

This plan serves as a coordinating document that provides broad- based policies, guidelines, and standards for administering the four trails in such a manner as to ensure the protection of trail resources, their interpretation, and their appropriate public use.

Published December 31, 1999

About the Author


The National Park Service (NPS) was created in 1916 and today manages over 390 units found in all 50 states and some of the U.S. territories. NPS supports and operates trails in three interlocking arenas: trails in parks, technical assistance to States and communities, and administration of much of the National Trails System.

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