National Park Service Active Transportation Guidebook

A Resource on Supporting Walking and Bicycling for National Parks and their Partners

This resource aims to support parks, gateway communities, and partners who are interested in pursuing opportunities to enhance walking and bicycling to and within national parks. The Guidebook provides key information, best practice examples, and numerous useful resources to help inspire and guide efforts that would allow visitors to experience their natural, cultural and historical places in new ways - through active transportation.

by National Park Service



Published July 13, 2018

About the Author


The National Park Service (NPS) was created in 1916 and today manages over 390 units found in all 50 states and some of the U.S. territories. NPS supports and operates trails in three interlocking arenas: trails in parks, technical assistance to States and communities, and administration of much of the National Trails System.

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