Metrics, Data, and Counting, Oh My!

Why it Doesn't Take a Wizard to Harness the Power of Advanced Data Collection and Analysis to Build the Trail Network of Your Dreams!

Tools for helping to identify opportunity, map a course of action, and quantify the benefits of walking, biking and trail development.

Presenters: Eric Oberg, Midwest Regional Office, Rails-to- Trails Conservancy; Liz Thorstensen, Vice President of Trail Development, Rails to Trails Conservancy; Greg Lindsey, Professor, University of Minnesota; Dave Schlabowske, Deputy Director, Wisconsin Bike Federation;

Looking to connect your trails to your neighbor’s trail system? Struggling to make the case and demonstrate how walking, biking, and trail use will truly benefit your community? Wondering just how those large trail networks across the country got their start? This session will explore data collection and metrics from a regional trail perspective. Experts representing three regional trail projects will show how these tools helped identify opportunity, mapped a course of action, quantified benefits of walking, biking, and trail development, and made the case.

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