Interpretive Plan for the Huron River National Water Trail

Lower Reach, Flat Rock to Lake Erie

The purpose of this plan is to help communities and stakeholders incorporate heritage on the lower reach of the nationally designated Huron River Water Trail (HRWT), from Flat Rock to Lake Erie, which will create a more meaningful trail experience and a greater sense of place.

by Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Parks and Recreation Division, RTP Grant Coordinator


FINAL Huron River Interpretive Plan


The lower Huron River has a fascinating heritage, encompassing Native Americans, French explorers, clams and Ford Mustangs. The purpose of this plan is to help communities and stakeholders incorporate heritage on the lower reach of the nationally designated Huron River Water Trail (HRWT), from Flat Rock to Lake Erie, which will create a more meaningful trail experience and a greater sense of place. Outdoor recreation may be the destination driver, but it is heritage that makes a place feel special, different and socially interesting – the opposite of generic. The plan identifies the significance of the area, target audiences, heritage stories (natural and cultural), interpretive methods and a unifying theme. It also considers other efforts along the river corridor, to avoid repetition and promote regional collaboration. The Huron River Watershed Council (HRWC) started this project on September 24, 2014, with a meeting in Flat Rock to work on a vision for the river corridor. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources’ (DNR) Heritage Trail Program began assisting in 2016.

Published December 01, 2017

About the Author


We are committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state's natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. We strive to protect natural and cultural resources, ensure sustainable recreation use and enjoyment, enable strong natural resource-based economies, improve and build strong relationships and partnerships, and foster effective business practices and good governance

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