filed under: trails as transportation


Improving the Built Environment

How Urban Trail Systems and Complete Streets Provide Connections Within Cities

This session will focus on the big and innovative thinking necessary to retrofit an urban environment for a multi-use trail system.

Speakers: Greta deMayo, Senior Associate, Ecos Environmental Design, Inc; Phillip Pugliese, Bicycle Coordinator, Outdoor Chattanooga

Take a densely built environment, the need for alternative transportation, desires for recreational opportunities, and goals of economic growth and you have the challenge faced today by many cities when looking at introducing trail connections. This session will focus on the big and innovative thinking necessary to retrofit an urban environment for a multi-use trail system and how complete streets policies help communities create road networks that are safe and inviting for everyone.

View Complete Streets Article Online

More Articles in this Category

Earmarks are an Opportunity for Trail Funding

The reemergence of earmarks in the infrastructure and appropriations process in Congress is creating huge opportunity for trail projects that are ready to go.

PedNet is Making a Difference on the Ground in Missouri

American Trails contributor Josh Adams recently interviewed Lawrence Simonson, who serves as the Chief Strategy Officer of the PedNet Coalition, to talk pedestrian safety, projects and obstacles, and making a difference in Missouri.

Strategic Agenda for Pedestrian and Bicycle Transportation

The 2016-2021 Strategic Agenda for Pedestrian and Bicycle Transportation builds on 25 years of progress toward increasing walking and biking safety and activity throughout the United States. The 1994 National Bicycling and Walking Study: Transportation Choices for Changing America set the stage for advancing safe, accessible, comfortable, and well-used pedestrian and bicycle transportation networks, with a focus on increasing trips and reducing injuries and fatalities.

Bike Network Mapping Idea Book

This resource highlights ways that different communities have mapped their existing and proposed bicycle networks. It shows examples of maps at different scales, while also demonstrating a range of mapping strategies, techniques, and approaches. Facility types represented on the respective maps and legends are each different because they represent a community’s unique context and needs.