If You Don't Count...

You Don't Count!

This session will present a number of different approaches to collecting data to develop estimates of the number of individuals using a trail system and the economic impact

Speakers: J. M. (Mike) Bowker, Research Social Scientist, Southern Research Station, USDA Forest Service; Karen Anderson, Recreation Planner, Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance Program, Midwest Region, National Park Service; Carl Knoch, Manager of Trail Development, Northeast Regional Office, Rails to Trails Conservancy; Donald Greer, Associate Professor, School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, University of Nebraska at Omaha; John Noble, Associate Professor, School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, University of Nebraska at Omaha

This session will present a number of different approaches to collecting data to develop estimates of the number of individuals using a trail system and the economic impact that those trail users have on the communities surrounding the trails. Research conducted on a 109 mile section of the Application Trail will examine the use and economics of America’s best know hiking trail. Trail usage and economic impact will be examined on a number of multi-use rail trails in both urban and rural environments. The methods, procedures, and results of these investigations will be presented with an eye to giving symposium attendees insights into how they might conduct similar studies.

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