filed under: federal legislation


How to Contact Your Representatives About Trail Issues

Are you worried about the future of our trails and public lands, but not sure what you can do? Calling your congressional delegation about trails issues is one of the most powerful things we can do as individuals.

by American Trails Staff

You don’t need to be an expert on the issue, but the more people who call and talk about the importance of trails in their daily lives, the more likely your representative is to notice. It really does work!

So, take five minutes and call your representatives’ offices—you can even call while on a walk enjoying the trails, public lands, and local parks you love.

Contacting Your Congressional Delegation

  1. Follow this link
  2. Enter your home address
  3. Your Representative and Senators will be listed along with the contact number for their D.C. office. We strongly encourage you to call.

First Time Calling? Here are some Tips!

  1. Introduce yourself, where you are from in the district/state, why you are calling.
  2. Mention your personal connection to trails and public lands in your state, local parks in your community, vacations to a nearby Forest/National Park/BLM land, hunting trips, horse/ATV/bike rides you’ve taken, importance to your business, etc.
  3. Ask your Member of Congress to do whatever it takes to make sure that they sponsor, vote, and act in support of the positive trails legislation being considered.
  4. Thank the person you are speaking to for their time and for passing on your concerns.

Published December 2018

More Articles in this Category

Recreational Trails Program Highlight: Brighton Park, Ohio

Brighton Park, formerly the Henninger Landfill, was a construction and demolition debris landfill in the Old Brooklyn neighborhood of Cleveland that ceased operation in the 1980s.

Recreational Trails Program Highlight: Prison Hill 5th Street Trailhead Project, Nevada

Visible throughout Carson City, the approximately 2,500 acre Prison Hill Recreation Area has been set aside and dedicated as open space for the community of Carson City.

A Call for Expanding Trails Research

Trails research can help support trail management decision-making and funding by providing objective, quantitative information describing trail users, their numbers and demographics, preferences, and economic expenditures.

Recreational Trails Program Highlight: Tonto Recreation Alliance's (TRĀL) Adopt-a-trail Program

TRĀL’s mission is to recruit, train, and coordinate a volunteer workforce to help the Tonto National Forest manage OHV recreation in the forest.