Guide to Sustainable Mountain Trails

Trail Assessment, Planning & Design Sketchbook -- 2007 Edition

This Guide to Sustainable Mountain Trails: Assessment, Planning & Design Sketchbook, 2007 Edition, has its roots in the foundational policies and ethics of federal conservation and preservation land management agencies such as the United States Forest Service and the National Park Service, and in the spirit of nonprofit agency partnership support for land management agency stewardship initiatives.

by National Park Service



Published January 01, 2007

About the Author


The National Park Service (NPS) was created in 1916 and today manages over 390 units found in all 50 states and some of the U.S. territories. NPS supports and operates trails in three interlocking arenas: trails in parks, technical assistance to States and communities, and administration of much of the National Trails System.

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