Greenway Proximity Study: A Look at Four Neighborhoods in Surrey, BC

by Surrey Parks, Recreation and Culture Department

The purpose of this study is to determine if single-family sites that border upon a greenway are influenced economically by their proximity to the greenway.

The purpose of this study is to determine if those single-family sites that border upon a greenway are influenced economically by their proximity to the greenway. The Surrey Parks, Recreation and Culture Department pre-selected subject neighborhoods within the City of Surrey for examination.

The central question of this study is: Does a greenway border affect single-family property value, in the four study neighborhoods and during the era from 1980 to 2001?

Our study, supported by relevant data and based upon an analysis of the factors influencing value, clearly supports the inference that a typical greenway border increases the value of single-family property, in the study neighborhoods during the era from 1980 through 2001. Specifically, the economic impact of greenway depends to some extent upon the design and nature of the greenway (type) and the characteristics of the neighborhood.

We estimate that adding the existing greenway border increases property value by $4,092 or 2.8 percent on an overall basis for all four neighborhoods.

Specifically, the results for Green Timbers indicated that greenways increase property values by $1,051 (0.8 percent), while in the Huntington and Bridlewood neighborhood greenways increased property values by $20,618 (8.4 percent) with results for the Semiahmoo Trail South neighbor hood indicating an increase in single-family property values by $17,515 (10.2 percent). A greenway border increases the value of single-family property in at least three of the four study neighborhoods. One neighborhood was not analyzed due to insufficient sample size.

Attached document published December 2001

More articles in this category

Bridging the Urban-Rural Economic Divide

posted Oct 26, 2023

It’s time for the narrative to shift from urban vs. rural to a shared economic future. Bridging the economic divide between urban and rural areas will require states, regions and localities to understand and bolster the relationship between urban and rural areas in economically meaningful and strategic ways.

Great Allegheny Passage Economic Impact Report

posted Oct 19, 2023

This report was developed by Fourth Economy in partnership with the Great Allegheny Passage Conservancy (formerly the Allegheny Trail Alliance). Research was conducted between the fall of 2020 and the spring of 2021.

2022 CDT Small Business Survey

posted Feb 14, 2023

From August to December 2021, the Continental Divide Trail Coalition surveyed 136 small business owners in 38 communities located along the Continental Divide Trail to learn more about how the Continental Divide Trail impacts their businesses, the local economy, and their support for public lands.

Impact of Trails Hub

posted Apr 11, 2022

Everything you need to know about the positive impact of trails on health, environment, economics, and more.

231 views • posted 03/13/2018