Difficult Trails in Difficult Places

This presentation will reveal the process of planning, designing and constructing trails within four different landscape settings identifying challenges and solutions.

by Mark Wilcox, American Society of Landscape Architects, Bill Neumann, Vice President, DHM Design, John M. Pflaum, PE, Project Manager, NV5

This presentation will reveal the process of planning, designing and constructing trails within four different landscape settings identifying challenges and solutions. Four case studies will be discussed; an urbanized trail corridor adjacent to a historic downtown; a regional trail along an industrialized and neglected creek corridor; a regional trail along a pristine mountain river; retrofitting an urban trail within a constrained major drainageway corridor. Each case study will: Demonstrate innovative trail planning when working with public agencies and the community. Explore difficult sites, the construction solutions and techniques to make successful trails. Implement good and sustainable practices in trail design.

About the Authors

Mark Wilcox bio not available.

Bill Neumann has a degree in Landscape Architecture from Colorado State University. Bill has been with DHM for over 28 years, specializing in the planning and design of parks, trails, and greenways. Bill has worked on dozens of award winning greenway projects across the country including the recently completed Witherspoon Greenway in Anchorage, Kentucky; Sand Creek Regional Greenway in Commerce City, Colorado; and the Blue River Greenway in Silverthorne, Colorado.

He understands the importance of creating spaces that benefit communities, while respecting natural systems, sensitive landscapes, habitats and cultural/historical sites. On every project, Bill considers the construction phase of a project equal in importance to the design process.

Bill has managed and been part of large multi-disciplinary teams, including planners, engineers, surveyors and ecologists. Bill believes in producing high quality designs and illustrative graphics to help clients visualize the design intent.

Contact: [email protected]

John Pflaum has over 36 years of experience in the planning, design, and construction of multi-use drainage and flood control improvements. His projects have included project management and engineering for the $8.6 million multi-use Little Dry Creek Flood Control and Greenway Improvements in Englewood, Colorado, and numerous Greenway projects that combine trail design with stream stabilization measures. His collaboration with DHM Design includes the Sand Creek Greenway, Purgatoire River Greenway and Bear Creek Greenway – all Colorado Greenway projects.

More articles by these authors

More Articles in this Category

Fort River Birding and Nature Trail

The Fort River Birding and Nature Trail is a universally accessible trail. It was presented with the 2014 Paul Winske Access Award by the Stavros Center for Independent Living.

Tools for Trails: Measuring and Surveying Tools

Before trail builders start digging, they first have to lay the trail, flag the line, and more to ensure a grade that not only matches the terrain but also is well throughout to prevent erosion.

GEOWEB® Geocells Repairs Storm-Damaged Recreational Trails Along Maine’s Coastline

GEOWEB® panels are used to reconstruct Kittery Point's walking trail and maintenance road.

Trail Tools: Grubbing Tools

Let’s talk about grubbing and raking tools! You might have heard the term grubbing before, but if you’re new to trail building, it may be unfamiliar. Grubbing is when you are removing earth and topsoil. Basically digging into the first while removing vegetation in the process. Trail builders may also call this process hogging.