Creating the Trails That Users Want So You Don't Get the Trails You Don't Want

Case studies of what works, best practices and techniques of building the correct type of trails, and information regarding the creation and maintenance of sustainable trail systems.

Speakers: Forrest Boe, Director, Trails and Waterways Division, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; Cam Lockwood, Enterprise Team Leader, Trails Unlimited an Enterprise Group of the US Forest Service; Jack Terrell, Senior Project Coordinator, National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council


A team of experts from a State and Federal agency as well as from a Trail User group will help you to understand how to build fun and sustainable trails in a way that will help to curtail off-trail travel. The session will help you to understand what trail users are seeking so that you may help to fulfill those needs. It will include case studies of what works, best practices and techniques of building the correct type of trails, and information regarding the creation and maintenance of sustainable trail systems.

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