filed under: interpretation


Continental Divide National Scenic Trail Interpretive Plan

The Continental Divide National Scenic Trail (CDNST) Interpretive Plan guides the development and implementation of information, orientation and interpretation for the CDNST. Specifically, this plan includes interpretive goals, objectives, themes, exhibit recommendations, and design guidelines for interpretive efforts associated with the trail.


Final Interp Plan


The entire concept of the CDNST planning and management is based on the project being socially responsive to the needs and situations of local areas. These areas contribute to the character of the Great Divide as much as the more evident physiographic features. The CDNST has been conceived as a “people’s trail.” A trail that would facilitate, but not dictate, the opportunity for the recreation user to actively (not passively) experience the magnificent variety of landscapes, natural phenomenon, prehistoric and historic actions of humans, and current uses of the resource rich backbone of America.

No publication date on original upload document.

Published September 01, 2015

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