Case Studies in Realizing Co-Benefits of Multimodal Roadway Design and Gray and Green Infrastructure

This document highlights case studies of projects that contribute to safe and connected pedestrian and bicycle networks in States and communities throughout the U.S., while at the same time providing resiliency and green infrastructure benefits that promote resiliency and relieve burdens on stormwater systems.

by Federal Highway Administration


Case Studies Grayand Green Infra


The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is committed to documenting and promoting connected pedestrian and bicycle networks in States and communities throughout the United States. Networks are interconnected pedestrian and/or bicycle transportation facilities that allow people of all ages and abilities to safely and conveniently get where they want to go. FHWA is working with its State and local partners and stakeholders to successfully implement gray and green infrastructure projects to manage stormwater, improve water quality, and to create healthier environments through strategies such as increasing pervious material, creating bioswales, and incorporating flow-through planters into projects. At the same time, State and local agencies are working to promote resiliency and relieve burdens on stormwater systems.

This report provides information to encourage agencies interested in making improvements to their pedestrian and bicycle networks that also provide gray and green infrastructure and resiliency benefits. The discussion of stormwater and mobility benefits will help communities better understand the variety of goals and outcomes they can achieve through their projects.

Published March 30, 2018

About the Author


The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), part of the US Department of Transportation, provides expertise, resources, and information to improve the nation's highway system and its intermodal connections. The Federal-Aid Highway Program provides financial assistance to the States to construct and improve the National Highway System, other roads, bridges, and trails.

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