Bikeway selection guide

The Bikeway Selection Guide from the Federal Highway Administration will help planners make informed decisions about the selection of bike- way types. This guide emphasizes engineering judgment, design flexibility, documentation, and experimentation.


FHWA-Bikeway-selection-guide


This document is a resource to help transportation practitioners consider and make informed trade-off decisions relating to the selection of bikeway types. It is intended to supplement planning and engineering judgment. It incorporates and builds upon the Federal Highway Administration’s (FHWA) support for design flexibility to assist transportation agencies in the development of connected, safe, and comfortable bicycle networks that meet the needs of people of all ages and abilities.

This guide references existing national resources from FHWA, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE), and others. It is not intended to supplant existing design guides, but rather serve as a decision support tool. It points to relevant sources of design information and focuses on the following question:

What type of bikeway should be chosen on this particular street or in this plan given real-world context, constraints, and opportunities?

Published February 2019

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