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Benefits Of Trails

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published Jan 1, 2019

Backcountry Discovery Routes® and Tourism: How Adventure Motorcyclists Can Help Your Community

In 2017, BDR routes generated $17.3 million in new tourism expenditures, with the average traveling party spending $3,769 on their BDR trip.


published Jan 1, 2019

2019 Economic Impact of Off-Highway Recreation in the State of Arizona

by Arizona State University

In 2016–2017, Arizona State University conducted a study to measure the economic impact of OHV recreation, by retained and out of state visitors, on the State of Arizona.


published Aug 30, 2012

A Snapshot of the Economic Impact of Outdoor Recreation

Outdoor recreation spending in Western states equaled $255.6 billion – nearly 40% of the national total. This includes purchases of outdoor gear and vehicles as well as travel expenditures when enjoying the great Western outdoors.


published Aug 30, 2012

The Economic Contributions of Outdoor Recreation: Technical Report on Methods and Findings

This study is an update and expansion of an earlier study of active outdoor recreation produced in 2006 by the Outdoor Industry Association. The 2006 study focused solely on human-powered (i.e. non-motorized) activities. While this study includes the same human-powered activities as the earlier work, an additional survey was conducted to gauge the economic contributions of outdoor recreation.


published Jan 1, 2014

Montana Recreational Off-Highway Vehicles – Fuel-Use and Spending Patterns

Residents spend about $208 million per year on OHV activities, and nearly all their entire out-of-pocket trip costs are for gasoline. We estimate that OHV users buy about 6.6 million gallons of gasoline per year. With a base tax of $0.27 per gallon, resident OHV users in Montana generate over $1.8 million in revenue for the state highway trust fund.


published Jan 1, 2015

Economic Importance of Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation: An Analysis of Idaho Counties

During the period August 2012 through November 2012, the University of Idaho, in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation (IDPR), surveyed Idaho’s registered off-highway-vehicle (OHV) owners. The goal of the survey was to determine the economic importance of OHV use in Idaho during the previous 12 months. The survey sample was drawn from IDPR-registered OHV owners. OHV activities not related to recreation (e.g., work) and out-of-state visitors could not be sampled. Trips and expenditures for OHV recreation in Idaho would be higher if nonresident OHV recreation could be estimated.


published Jun 23, 2014

Economics of Idaho Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation

Off-highway vehicle (OHV) recreation in Idaho is big business. Idaho OHV enthusiasts took close to 1 million recreation trips in Idaho during 2012 and spent about $434 million – $186 million on OHV recreation trips and $248 million on OHV capital expenditures such as the vehicles themselves.


published Jul 11, 2014

The Economic and Fiscal Impact of the Hatfield-McCoy Trail System in West Virginia

The analysis indicates that the nearly $1.7 million in spending conducted by the Hatfield-McCoy Trails for day-to-day operations generated an additional $1.6 million in economic activity within the State, for a total operational impact of $3.3 million. Even more notably, the Hatfield-McCoy Trails bring non-local visitors to the area whose spending is estimated to generate an additional $19 million in economic activity in West Virginia. Together, the total estimated economic impact of the Hatfield-McCoy Trails is more than $22 million.


published Jan 1, 2016

Economic Contribution of Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation in Colorado

During the 2014–2015 season, motorized recreational enthusiasts spent an estimated $1.6 billion while taking trips using motorized vehicles for recreational purposes. More than 92 percent of these expenditures occurred during the summer recreational season. In addition to spending money on trips, households that participate in motorized recreation also spend money on maintenance, repairs, accessories, vehicle storage, and miscellaneous items associated with their vehicles. Motorized recreational enthusiasts spent more than an estimated $724 million annually on various items to support and enhance their experiences in Colorado, including $163 million in new vehicle purchases. In total, motorized recreational enthusiasts were responsible for $2.3 billion in direct expenditures related to motorized recreation in Colorado during the 2014–2015 season.


published Jan 1, 2018

MO-MOTO OHV Incorporated – OHV Tourism Economic Impact Overview

OHV recreation is a proven financial stimulus to the tourism market with the average rider spending a minimum of $100 on a single day trip. We should encourage struggling areas to embrace OHV tourism as we have the opportunity to directly impact and benefit financial success of local businesses. We can connect rural Missouri to OHV trails, which would provide new employment and income while bringing new money to these distressed regions. OHV tourism can diversify the economy of South East Missouri and create a culture of entrepreneurship based around trail oriented business (outfitters, rentals, guides, cabins, hotels, restaurants, etc) the same way the state park industry has to several Missouri communities.


Related Pages and Dedicated Sections


posted Jun 18, 2020

1,028 Trail Projects Can Put Americans To Work

COVID-19 has created an economic downturn. Over 1,000 trail projects are waiting for funding to help put Americans back to work.


posted Feb 25, 2020

Trails Move People

Creating a strong, cooperative, and unified voice for a diverse trails community


posted Feb 20, 2020

Mental Health Benefits of Trails

Beyond the physical health benefits of trails, the mental health benefits of trail access is also invaluable.


posted Feb 20, 2020

Health Benefits of Trails

Does access to trails really lead to healthier communities? According to research the answer is a resounding yes.


posted Feb 20, 2020

Trails Are Transportation

Trails are critical infrastructure and, as such, they should receive the financial and human resource allocations necessary to maintain their critical role.


posted Feb 19, 2020

Trails Make Economic Sense

The benefits of expanding and improving the outdoor recreation economy are clear and compelling.


posted Feb 19, 2020

Trails Are Inclusive

Trails, by their very nature, promote social, racial, gender, and economic equity. They are almost always free to use, are available 24/7/365, and provide transportation alternatives no matter what mode of travel you use.


posted Feb 19, 2020

Why Trails?

Where would we be without trails? It is a simple question, but it is worth pondering. The longer you sit with this question, the more you will discover the overwhelming impact that trails have on our lives. Often in very unexpected ways.


Results from the Business Directory


Outdoor Foundation

Washington, District of Columbia

Inspiring the outdoor habit in kids and families by connecting research, knowledge, people and programs. With the goal of everyone experiencing the fun and joy of the outdoors once a week.


419 7th Street, NW, Suite 401, Washington, District of Columbia 20004
(202) 271-3252 • [email protected]

Lawrence Hopewell Trail

Pennington, New Jersey

The LHT’s 22-plus mile trail winding through Hopewell and Lawrence Townships offers safe access to various sections of the towns for kids, families, bicyclists, joggers, hikers and commuters. This family-oriented trail b...

American Trails Member


The Historic Hunt House 197 Blackwell Rd., Pennington, New Jersey 08534

StreetStrider

Huntington Beach, California

StreetStrider is the first 2-in-1 Indoor + Outdoor Elliptical Bike. It provides a full-body, low-impact, high-intensity workout.


16331 Gothard St. Suite C, Huntington Beach, California 92647
(800) 348-0998 • [email protected]

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