Atlanta Beltline’s Eastside Trail

A Triple Bottom Line Success

Repurposing historic, abandoned, and urban railroad corridors provides a triple bottom-line success story.


Presenters: Kevin W. Burke, Senior Landscape Architect, Atlanta BeltLine, Inc.; Valdis Zusmanis, Senior Landscape Architect, Perkins+Will, Inc.

Repurposing historic, abandoned, and urban railroad corridors provides a triple bottom-line success story. Cleaning up contamination from decades of railroad use in order to construct a multi-use trail as part of the $4.8 billion Atlanta BeltLine is the first step of a fundamental change to the city’s urban core. The use of this inaugural section of the trail has created increased social interaction among users, provided the epitome of a Safe Route to School, enhanced healthy outcomes, and increased business for adjacent businesses.

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