Documents And Media

Subcategories • StudiesTraining MaterialsITS MaterialsVideo



published Jul 2014

Montana Recreational Snowmobiles

by Bureau of Business and Economic Research, University of Montana

The Bureau of Business and Economic Research’s most recent surveys suggest that about 8 percent of the state's households include snowmobile recreationists. Nearly always, the whole family participates. With an average household size of about 2.5, perhaps as many as 100,000 Montanans participate in the sport each winter.


published Dec 2015

Best Management Practices for Adaptive Trail Grooming

by American Council of Snowmobile Assns. (ACSA)

Trail grooming has changed significantly since initial trails and grooming programs were established decades ago. Snowmobile tourism has grown, bringing higher user expectations and requirements. At the same time trail grooming equipment and operating costs have also increased dramatically compared to costs in previous decades. Consequently grooming management in today’s operating atmosphere requires more adaptive approaches to be most responsive to increased needs, expectations, and costs.


published Dec 2006

Evaluation of ATV Use On Groomed Snowmobile Trails

The growth in ATV numbers has driven a desire for more places to operate them recreationally on trails. In some areas of the Snowbelt this has led to a growing interest for ATV operation on groomed snowmobile trails during the winter season. This can be a challenge for land and trail managers.


published Sep 2014

Assessment of Tracked OHV Use on Groomed Snowmobile Trails

by American Council of Snowmobile Assns. (ACSA)

Many snowmobile trail managers are facing new management challenges related to OHV use that have been evolving over the past ten to fifteen years. This evolution has included significant growth in overall OHV numbers, the addition of wider side-by-side utility vehicles (UTVs), and some OHVs now being equipped with tracks. Consequently a growing number of local administrators must evaluate what’s best for their local area: continuing to provide only ‘single use’ motorized trails for snowmobiles – or integrating concurrent snowmobile/OHV use onto some groomed trails.


published Jun 2018

The Economic Impact of Snowmobiling in Utah

by Institute of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism at Utah State University

An analysis on the value of snowmobiling to Utah’s economy, the sociodemographic composition of participants, and more.


posted Aug 14, 2020

Management Factors to Consider Regarding Concurrent Fat Tire Bicycle Use on Groomed Snowmobile Trails

by American Council of Snowmobile Assns. (ACSA)

All recreational trail use, whether motorized or nonmotorized, requires active management. Trail management should ensure adherence to private or public land use prescriptions, adequate resource protection, and that appropriate visitor experiences are provided. Trail management policies should be set at the local level to ensure they best fit local circumstances.


published Jan 2016

Trail Use and Management of Electric Mountain Bikes: Land Manager Survey Results

by IMBA Trail Solutions

In order to better guide research into the range of potential social and environmental impacts and benefits related to the use of eMTBs on natural surface trails, IMBA and the BPSA are interested in what questions land managers have regarding this new use. The survey explicitly targeted land managers’ experiences and concerns regarding eMTB use on natural surface and/or singletrack trails – not paths or bikeways – although some land managers are responsible for both types of trail infrastructure.


published Dec 2006

Chain Saw and Crosscut Saw Training Course

by USDA Forest Service

The Chain Saw and Crosscut Saw Training Course is a 16- to 32-hour course for basic to intermediate chain saw and crosscut saw users. The course is designed to provide the technical knowledge and skills that employees or volunteers will need to use these tools safely.


published Sep 2009

Hollow Rock Access Area Master Plan

The planned Hollow Rock Access Area is a multi-jurisdictional project to conserve significant natural and cultural resource lands along New Hope Creek and to make portions of the site available for low-impact recreational uses.


published Sep 2007

Historical and Interpretation Study, Trail of Tears National Historic Trail

by U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

The purpose of this study is to provide baseline historical information pertaining to those portions of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail that cross onto lands managed by the FWS at the White River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Arkansas, the Wheeler NWR in Alabama, and the Tennessee NWR in Tennessee.