Documents And Media

Subcategories • StudiesTraining MaterialsITS MaterialsVideo



published Jan 2015

California State Parks Accessibility Guidelines

by California State Parks, Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division

The Accessibility Guidelines are intended as a reference manual and department policy on accessible design and shall be utilized in planning and implementing regular maintenance activities, construction projects, publications, exhibits, new programs, and special events. The guidelines are not a comprehensive set of requirements for all situations, but rather a summary of information from many sources which provide guidance for common uses in the State Park System. This document is an update to the 2009 edition.


published Jun 2018

Guidelines for a Quality Trail Experience

by Bureau of Land Management, International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA)

In the context of mountain bike trails, excellence is realized when a trail design merges the desired outcomes and difficulty that a rider seeks with the setting in which the outcomes are realized.


published Oct 2009

Virginia’s Long-Distance Trail Network: Connecting Our Commonwealth

The purpose of this plan is to assess progress to-date and develop a strategy to connect local and regional systems into a statewide trail network reaching to all areas of the Commonwealth.


published Sep 2005

The San Francisco Bay Trail Project Gap Analysis Study

The Bay Trail Project is a nonprofit organization administered by the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) that plans, promotes and advocates for the implementation of a continuous 500-mile bicycling and hiking path around San Francisco Bay. Two of the most commonly asked questions regarding the Bay Trail: “When will it be done?” and “How much will it cost?”


published Aug 2015

Developing Trail Systems: Costs and Best Practices

by San Luis Valley Great Outdoors (SLV GO!)

Trails are more than simply lines on a map, a form of transportation or route to destinations. Trails are an experience. Engaging trails systems provide a sense of unique place, highlight natural topography and attract outdoor-based tourism. A vast and varied experience hooks trails users and leaves them wanting to return for more exploration. This tool kit offers suggestions for building destination-worthy trail systems.


published Dec 2011

Making the Trail Visible and Visitor Ready: A Plan for the James River Segment

by National Park Service

The Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail joined the National Trails System following designation by Congress in 2006. The trail helps visitors experience, envision, understand, and protect what the explorers and inhabitants of the region encountered 400 years ago.


published Mar 2012

Trail Tales Educational Outreach & Interpretive Plan

Trail Tales is a community-focused educational outreach and shoreline interpretive program centered in the City of Anacortes in Skagit County Washington.


published Jul 2010

Interpretive Planning Tools for Historic Areas, Historic Trails and Gateways

by National Park Service

This toolkit was designed to assist managers in developing and implementing regional or site-specific interpretive plans. It describes each step in the process from the early planning stages through implementation to evaluation.


posted Aug 19, 2020

Continental Divide National Scenic Trail Interpretive Plan

The Continental Divide National Scenic Trail (CDNST) Interpretive Plan guides the development and implementation of information, orientation and interpretation for the CDNST. Specifically, this plan includes interpretive goals, objectives, themes, exhibit recommendations, and design guidelines for interpretive efforts associated with the trail.


published Jan 2009

The 2009 Continental Divide National Scenic Trail Comprehensive Plan

by USDA Forest Service

In order to achieve the objective of establishing a continuous trail of the magnitude and quality of the CDNST, it is necessary to establish a formal process for integrating the CDNST requirements into the long-range land and resource management programs of the various Federal and State agencies. Such a process should be both faithful to the intentions and requirements of the National Trails System Act and compatible with the regulations and procedures under which the agencies must work.