Documents And Media

Subcategories • StudiesTraining MaterialsITS MaterialsVideo



published Dec 2014

How Communities are Paying to Maintain Trails, Bike Lanes, and Sidewalks

by Advocacy Advance

This report addresses both the technical and political challenges of how communities are paying to maintain trails, bike lanes, and sidewalks. It examines agency maintenance policies and provides examples of communities who’ve successfully made these facilities a priority.


published Jun 2015

Hiking Trails in America Pathways to Prosperity

by American Hiking Society

Fifty years ago President Johnson set in motion the establishment of a national system of trails for America. Since LBJ’s famous speech outlining his vision, America has accomplished much . . .


published Jun 2018

Investigating the Thru-hiker Experience: A Study on the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail

The phenomena of thru-hiking has been on a dramatic rise, spurring hikers to venture onto increasingly remote and challenging trails over extended periods of time. Despite the recent popularity of thru-hiking, the field remains relatively unstudied. In recreation, the expectations held beforehand have been linked to perceptions after an activity, but this has not been explored in thru-hiking.


published Jun 2013

Effects of Pack Weight on Endurance of Long-distance Hikers

This study evaluated pack weight to understand the limits of long-term load carriage. Participants were Appalachian Trail hikers who attempted to complete the entire trail in the 2012 season.


published Apr 2018

Santa Rosa Public Art Master Plan

The Plan describes what the Public Art Program’s priorities should be. The Public Art Program will catalyze new projects, provide guidance to projects undertaken by developers and others, and continue community outreach and education around public art.


posted Aug 18, 2020

Hank Aaron State Trail Art Concept Plan

The Friends of Hank Aaron State Trail commissioned this Art Concept Plan to lay the groundwork for the placement of public art along the Trail. This Plan identifies sites in which art could most effectively be placed, establishes principles for its placement, and explores how art can go beyond familiar conventions to reinforce the identity of the Trail and its surroundings.


published Aug 2015

Exercise Intensity and Performance Aspects of Snow Biking through the Use of a Fat Bike

In recent years, fat bikes have become a popular option for mountain bikers. A fat bike is a mountain bike equipped with tires ranging from 9.3 – 10.1 cm wide, twice as wide as a traditional mountain bike tire (Barber, 2014). This allows them to be ridden at an inflation pressure as low as 27579 Pascal (4 PSI). The wide surface area, and low inflation pressure, of these tires allows for excellent handling of the bicycle while riding over sand, mud, and snow. It is difficult, if not impossible, for a traditional mountain bike to ride over such surfaces.


published Feb 2016

The Emergence of “Fat Bikes” in the USA; Trends, potential consequences and management implications

In the USA, sales and use of “fat bikes” (bicycles with 75–120 mm-wide tires) have increased dramatically in the past five years. These bikes are designed to open new terrain to cyclists, including snow-covered trails and softer ground surfaces impossible to ride with a standard mountain bike. In this paper, we discuss the extent and possible trends of fat bike use, potential impacts, conflicts and land management approaches.


published Jun 2018

Outdoor Participation Report 2018

by Outdoor Foundation

A participant in outdoor recreation is defined as an individual who took part in one or more of 42 outdoor activities at least once during 2017.


published Dec 1999

Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails Comprehensive Management and Use Plan / Final Environmental Impact Statement

by National Park Service

This Comprehensive Management and Use Plan / Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Oregon, California, Mormon Pioneer, and Pony Express National Historic Trails is shaped, in part, by the planning requirements found in section 5(f) of the National Trails System Act. It focuses on the trails’ purpose and significance, issues and concerns related to current conditions along the trails, resource protection, visitor experience and use, and long-term administrative and management objectives. Elements of the proposed plan have been developed in cooperation with federal, state, and local agencies, as well as nonprofit trails organizations — the entities that form the core of any partnership for national historic trails.