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Forest Service announces traill projects for ARRA economic recovery funds

From USDA Forest Service


USDA Forest Service - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
CIM Projects - Trails

By state: AK - AZ - CA - CO - FL - ID - IL - IN - MI - MN - MO - MT - NV - NM - NC - OR - PA - PR - TN - VA - WA

Alaska

 

Iditarod National Historic Trail Improvement for Improved Visitor Safety

Estimated Funding: $ 2,630,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Iditarod Trail Alliance (NGO) Seward Trailblazers, Bureau of Land Management
(INHT Trail Administrator)
Borough: Kenai Peninsula

The Iditarod National Historic Trail (INHT), south of Anchorage commemorates America's last great gold rush. It connects us to a time when sled dogs and mushers hauled tons of mail and supplies over 2,600 miles of frozen trail and tundra. The Chugach National Forest staff is restoring and developing over 180 miles of year-round recreation trail along the Southern Trek of
the Iditarod between Seward and Girdwood. Many partners support this high profile effort. It will be a great contribution to statewide Centennial celebrations. This project will improve 26 miles of the trail. It will install or replace seven interpretive information kiosks at trailheads. It will complete two priority segments from Johnson Pass through Turnagain Pass and from Primrose north to Vagt Lake. These trail segments will provide outstanding year-round opportunities to enjoy the Iditarod National Historic Trail within a one or two hour drive of Anchorage.

Iditarod National Historic Trail 6 Bridges for Safety and Protection

Estimated Funding: $ 625,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Iditarod Trail Alliance (NGO) Seward Trailblazers, Bureau of Land Management
(INHT Trail Administrator)
Borough: Kenai Peninsula

The Iditarod National Historic Trail (INHT), south of Anchorage, commemorates America's last great gold rush. It connects people to a time when sled dogs and mushers hauled tons of mail and supplies over 2,600 miles of frozen trail and tundra. The Chugach National Forest staff is restoring and developing over 180 miles of year-round recreation trail along the Southern Trek of
Iditarod between Seward and Girdwood. Many partners support this high profile effort. It will be a great contribution to statewide Centennial celebrations. This project will construct five snow machine bridges. This will increase safety and provide a travel route generally outside of avalanche zones. This project will also replace a pedestrian bridge over Winner Creek Gorge near Girdwood, fixing current safety and deferred maintenance issues. These six bridges will greatly improve the access opportunities for outdoor recreation. Local small communities will see an improvement to their economies from these connections to the trail. It will increase
opportunities for businesses to provide services to more trail users.

Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center and Russian River Angler Trail Accessibility

Estimated Funding: $ 3,375,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Alaska Recreation Management, Inc (RRAT) Russian River Interagency Coordination
Group (RRAT)
Boroughs: Juneau, Kenai Peninsula

For some people, experiencing the Alaska outdoors is out of reach because of mobility or accessibility needs. This project will provide accessible routes to historic overlook sites and world class fishing for people of all ages and abilities. The first trail is in Juneau within the Tongass National Forest. This is home of the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center, the most visited tourist site in Alaska. It will improve the short Trail of Time near the visitor center. The second trail will provide access to the Russian River Angler Trail, the most used trail on the Chugach National Forest. It provides access for over 75,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance visitors annually for excellent sockeye salmon and rainbow trout fishing. The only access to this famous riverside trail is on four stairways descending 60 vertical feet from bluff-top parking areas making it difficult for people with a mobility or accessibility need to access the trail. The trail will provide a route for people of all ages and abilities to this famous destination.

Admiralty and Misty Fiords National Monument Trail

Health and Safety Improvements
Estimated Funding: $ 1,048,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: SAGA
Borough /Area: Ketchikan Gateway Borough; Skagway-Hoonah-Angoon Census Area

This project will improve about 12 miles of trails in the Misty Fiords and Admiralty National Monuments. These wilderness areas on the Tongass National Forest are considered world-class visitor destinations. In addition, the Georg Island trail project on the Hoonah Ranger District will provide access to an historic World War II site. This project will employ Southeast Alaska Guidance Association youth crews. This will create development of job skills, associated with construction and maintenance projects. These communities have minimal opportunities for youth employment or job training. Continued maintenance needs will result in future seasonal job
opportunities. These trail improvements will eliminate health and safety hazards. Youth crews will replace deteriorated and failed footbridges and resurface trails. This will improve public access for subsistence and recreation users in these remote locations. Results will include improved watershed conditions, creating healthy habitat for salmon and other wildlife.

Alaganik Slough Boardwalk Repair for Health, Safety and Accessibility

Estimated Funding: $ 900,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Area: Valdez-Cordova Census Area

The Alaganik Day Use Area in the heart of the Copper River Delta is one of the most popular sites on the Delta. It is one of the few places in this 700,000-acre wetland with vehicle access. The Alaganik Area provides wildlife viewing and beautiful scenery, hunting, fishing, and boating. The accessible boardwalk was built in 1993-1995 with the help of international volunteers. The Alaska Governor noted the project’s excellent barrier-free design for the boardwalk, viewing blind and elevated observation platform. Frost heaving has caused the boardwalk to no longer meet ADA and ABA accessibility standards and it is unsafe during wet or icy conditions. This project will replace foundation supports and re-level the 850-foot elevated boardwalk and will remove safety issues and repair it. The boardwalk will once more be a key site for recreation use and for Cordova's international Shorebird Festival as it will then meet
agency safety and accessibility standards. The boardwalk will once more be a key site for recreation use and for Cordova's international Shorebird Festival.

Petersburg Mountain Trail Group Maintenance for Safety and Accessibility

Estimated Funding: $ 1,640,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Borough / Areas: Prince of Wales-Outer Ketchikan Census Area; Sitka Borough; Wrangell- Petersburg Census Area

Residents in the Southeast Alaska communities of Petersburg, Craig and Sitka depend upon safe trails and healthy flora and fauna to draw visitor dollars each year. In addition, deteriorating trails harm wetlands and watersheds. Several very popular trails near these communities have serious public safety issues as the result of deferred maintenance. Public safety in remote locations is critical. An injury in the wilds of Alaska, far from medical help, could have life or death consequences. For this project, workers will install new planks and crushed rock surfacing. They will add anti-slip tread material, replace failing trail bridges and rebuild failed sections of
trail. These improvements will allow greater accessibility and safety for the public and will eliminate wetland and watershed impacts. This project will safeguard recreation guide jobs businesses in communities with high unemployment rates.

Wrangell Boardwalk Trails Deferred Maintenance for Safety and Protection

Estimated Funding: $ 1,264,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Borough / Area: Ketchikan Gateway Borough; Wrangell-Petersburg Census Area

Ketchikan and Wrangell are important gateways to Southeast Alaska. Ketchikan is often the first stop for cruise ship passengers in summer. Wrangell is the portal to the Stikine-LeConte Wilderness and Anan Creek Wildlife Viewing Observatory. This is an unique bear viewing site with seven heavily used trails that extend over nine miles where visitors can see both black and brown bears in their natural habitat. The work will fix public safety issues that were a result of deferred maintenance. It will include installing new planks, new crushed rock surface, installing new anti-slip tread material on planks and replacing four failing trail bridges. This work will also improve watershed and wetlands. These trail projects will support needed local jobs in high unemployment areas. This work will also support the local recreation guide businesses and the supply and services industries. This project is especially critical for the community of Wrangell, which has been depressed economically for over 10 years with a significant population decrease.

Tongass OHV Bridge Replacement and Trail Maintenance for Visitor Safety and Protection

Estimated Funding: $ 1,500,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Boroughs: Sitka, Yakutat

Residents in the small communities of Yakutat and Sitka depend on all terrain vehicles and off highway vehicle (ATV/OHV) trails. Residents use these trails for subsistence (living from the land and streams) and recreation access. Subsistence is critical for the survival of residents in rural villages in Alaska. Trail use has grown greatly in recent years and maintenance funding has dropped. It has created critical health and safety issues. It has also resulted in serious watershed and fisheries harm. The communities are highly dependent upon recreation income associated with guided fishing on salmon streams. Improving these trails will also provide job opportunities for local supply and recreation businesses. This project will restore historic ATV/OHV trails used by these communities. The project will reconstruct four miles of OHV trail next to the Dangerous River near Yakutat. On the Sitka Mud Bay trail system, workers will grade, brush, establish drainage and replace failing bridges.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Arizona

 

Forest Wide Trail Maintenance (YCC Crews)

Estimated Funding: $ 850,000
Partners: YCC, Arizona Trail Association
Counties: Graham, Pima, Santa Cruz

Work entails reduction of deferred maintenance and improvement of the forest-wide trails
program on the Coronado National Forest. A safer experience will be provided to visitors due to
an easily identifiable and traversable trail system. Health and safety will be improved overall
through a reduction in lost/overdue visitors, fewer injuries (due to reduced hazards within trails),
and public health relating to mind, body, and spirit which are associated with increased fitness,
reduced stress, spiritual connection, etc. Fire risk reduction will be a secondary benefit as trail
systems provide a fuel break and limit the spread of wildfires. Additionally, fire line is frequently
constructed utilizing existing trail systems for both containment lines around the fire and access
into wildfire areas.

YCC Residential Program

Estimated Funding: $ 175,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Dahlberg Foundation, Prescott Unified School District
County: Yavapa

The Youth Conservation Corps provides the perfect opportunity for youth to learn to work
together as a team, develop their natural skills as leader, and learn how to make a difference in
caring for the natural environment. The Prescott National Forest, in partnership with the
Dahlberg Foundation (Mingus Springs Outdoor Learning Center) will be sponsoring a combined
residential and commuter program for 40 Yavapai County youth (ages 15-18) for five weeks
during the summer of 2009. Enrollees (supervised by experienced crew leaders) will work in the
outdoors on critical conservation projects involving trails, fence lines, wildlife habitat, and
watershed improvement. The youth who participate in this special program will learn skills they
will carry with them throughout their lives. This program is a boost, not just financially for the
youth of Yavapai County, but for the legacy it leaves with the next generation and the synergy
and enthusiasm programs like this bring to our community.

Stop 9 Sabino Canyon Trail Bridge

Estimated Funding: $ 120,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Friends of Sabino
County: Pima

The Sabino Canyon area is one of the crown jewels of the Tucson region. It has a very high
visitor rate and enhances local recreation and tourism. This project provides a safer experience to
visitors. It will build a foot-bridge across a debris-filled drainage between the end of the Sabino
tram road and Forest trail #23 trailhead at the top of the Sabino Canyon Recreation Area with
access to the Pusch Ridge Wilderness. The foot-bridge will allow safe and easy access to the
wilderness area for hunters, fisherman, birders, hikers, and other outdoor enthusiasts. As a result,
community health and safety is improved through reduced lost/overdue visitor, fewer injuries
(due to reduced hazards within trails), and public health relating to mind, body, and spirit which
are associated with increased fitness, reduced stress, spiritual connection, etc.

Saffel Canyon Trail System

Estimated Funding: $ 416,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Apache County Roughriders ATV Organization, Town of Eagar
Counties: Apache and Navajo

The project occurs on the Springerville Ranger District and will address health and safety
concerns and reduce deferred trail maintenance. It will be completed by local contractors and
includes the following: purchase and installation of regulatory and informational signage for the
trailhead and along the trail; construction of erosion control structures to provide watershed
protection; surfacing of 26 miles of trail with aggregate; and repair and/or replacement of fifteen
cattle guards.

Rim Vista Trail Paving / Mobility Disability Accessibility

Estimated Funding: $ 150,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
County: Navajo

The Rim Vista Trail winds along the top of the Mogollon Rim for three miles with beautiful
views to the south and west of Central Arizona's mountain ranges. The trail is within the Rim
Lakes Recreation Area, a popular destination with the Phoenix metropolitan area during the
summer. The Rim Vista Trail connects 2 developed campgrounds and 3 vista points. Currently
the trail is a combination of native surfacing, gravel and paved surface. In 2004, a grant with the
Arizona State Parks improved a portion of the trail and extended the trail to the second
campground. Over the last 5 years, Boy Scouts, The American Hiking Society and the Arizona
Volunteers for the Outdoors have spent many hours to improve the trail. This project will bring
the trail up to accessibility standards by improving surface material, width and grade. These
surface improvements will provide another opportunity for forest visitors with mobility
disabilities.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

California

 

Carson Iceberg / Hoover Wilderness Trails Maintenance and Stewardship

Estimated Funding: $ 300,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Great Basin Institute (Nevada Conservation Corps) Backcountry Horsemen, High
Sierra & Mother Lode Chapters; Youth Conservation Corps; Friends of Hope Valley
Counties: Alpine and Mono

The Carson-Iceberg and Hoover Wilderness areas, located in the eastern Sierra Mountains, have
extensive trails networks with extensive maintenance needs. These requirements are in both
high-visitation corridors, such as the Hoover portals to Yosemite, as well as in remote settings
where maintenance has been largely nonexistent. These trails must be maintained to ensure
resource protection and visitor safety. Around 60,000 visitors frequent the Carson-Iceberg
Wilderness, and around 100,000 visitors traverse the Hoover Wilderness. This project will
address widespread trail maintenance needs by hiring young adults to work on Nevada
Conservation Corps crews. Crew members will benefit from the employment, job skills, and the
environmental education gained from their work. Partner groups and volunteers will leverage
project funding through assistance with basic maintenance, visitation and resource monitoring
along the trails. Providing these employment opportunities will be particularly valuable in Alpine
and Mono Counties which have some of the highest unemployment statistics in California, with
nearly the highest unemployment rates in the country.

Wilderness Trail Projects

Estimated Funding: $ 4,100,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Student Conservation Association, North Bay Conservation Corps, California
Conservation Corps, AmeriCorps, Back Country Horsemen of America, Pacific Crest Trail
Association
Counties: Alpine, Colusa, Glenn, Kern, Lake, Mendocino, Monterey, Orange, Placer, Riverside,
San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Siskiyou, Tehama, Trinity, Ventura

Trails provide a gateway for Americans, both young and old, to experience the outdoors and
connect with nature. Wilderness trails provide a unique opportunity for visitors to access and
experience remote areas of their National Forests. Wilderness trails in poor condition erode,
causing sedimentation in nearby streams and making the trail impassible. This project funds
maintenance and repair of trails through wilderness areas on national forests throughout
California. Repair and reconstruction of wilderness trails is highly labor intensive and requires
using hand tools and other non-mechanized equipment. This project work will be completed by a
variety of local partners, including young adults involved with the network of Conservation
Corps throughout California. These young adults will be involved in labor intensive trail work
while developing vital trade skills and a land conservation ethic. The public will benefit from an
improved trail system and the access to wilderness areas it provides, the health benefits gained
from hiking the trails, and the opportunity to connect to the outdoors.

Non-Motor/Non-Wilderness Trails

Estimated Funding: $ 9,673,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Nevada Conservation Corps, California Conservation Corps, Student Conservation
Association, AmeriCorps, Back Country Horsemen of America, Tahoe Rim Trail Association,
Pacific Crest Trail Association, Town of Mammoth, Federal Highway Administration
States: California, Nevada
Counties: California: Butte, Calaveras, Del Norte, El Dorado, Humboldt, Kern, Lassen, Mono,
Plumas, Sierra, Siskiyou, Trinity, Tuolumne, Yuba. Nevada: Douglas

This project involves trail repair and reconstruction of heavily used, non-motorized trails on
National Forests throughout California. Trails provide a gateway for Americans, both young and
old, to experience the outdoors and connect with nature through their National Forests. Trails in
poor condition can erode to the point of being impassible, causing sedimentation in nearby
streams and preventing access to public lands. Much needed trail repair work will be completed
through this project by a variety of local partners, including young adults involved with the
network of Conservation Corps throughout California. These young adults will be involved in
labor intensive trail work while developing vital trade skills and a land conservation ethic. The
project includes making select trails accessible to people with disabilities. It also involves work
on the popular Pacific Crest National Recreation Trail. The public will benefit from improved
trail access and the health benefits associated with hiking and connecting to the outdoors.

Trail Bridges

Estimated Funding: $ 1,000,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Counties: El Dorado, Plumas, Sierra

This project involves reconstruction of trail bridges on National Forests throughout California,
including bridges along the popular Pacific Crest Trail and the heavily used Quincy community
trail system. Trail bridges provide critical connections between people and their public lands.
They provide access over otherwise impassable streams and drainages, and help protect sensitive
ecological areas. Trail bridges are used by many users, including pedestrians, bicyclists,
horseback riders, and off-highway vehicle enthusiasts. Some trail bridges are in poor condition
and pose potential hazards to users and the natural environment surrounding them. By
reconstructing or replacing these trail bridges, dangerous trail crossings will be eliminated, thus
increasing the available access, use and enjoyment of forest trails by the public. This project will
increase opportunities for Americans to utilize trails, recognize the health benefits provided by
hiking and connect with the outdoors through their National Forests.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Colorado


San Juan National Forest Trails and Trail Bridges Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 2,200,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Southwest Conservation Corps
County: Dolores

The San Juan National Forest averages 1.7 million visitor days annually, contributing
significantly to the tourism industry in the Four Corners area of Colorado. The 1,800 mile trail
system attracts many visitors and includes major segments of the Continental Divide and
Colorado trails. This project will repair hundreds of trail miles and numerous trail bridges to
ensure resource protection and visitor safety. Work will include tread and drainage
improvements, stabilization, cribbing, clearing, brushing, bridge repair, and signing. Trail work
will be accomplished through an agreement with Southwest Conservation Corps, an established
partner that trains crew leaders and maintains a ready pool of job applicants. Crews include
American Indian and Hispanic youths from low-income families. The bridge work will be
accomplished by contract. This project will enhance visitor safety and experience, improve forest
health, and preserve access for management and fire suppression.

Veterans Jobs Trail Project

Estimated Funding: $ 458,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
County: Conejos

Veterans often struggle with transitioning back into civilian employment and everyday life.
Historically, military veterans maintain higher unemployment and homelessness rates upon
discharge. Without effective support and substantive economic options, many veterans face
serious hardship. Veterans Green Jobs (VGJ) mission is to support veterans to become leaders in
the emerging green jobs industries. VGJ promotes veterans as a dedicated and disciplined
workforce available to help restore the environment, economy, and communities. The Southwest
Conservation Corps (SCC) employs young people while providing them with education, life
skills, and an opportunity to make a difference. In exchange, they complete services that benefit
the public. VGJ/SCC established a collaborative program for veterans interested in natural
resource/conservation corps employment. The VGJ/SCC partnership is similar to the Civilian
Conservation Corps model of 1933 to 1942, in intent and purpose circa 2009. On the Rio Grande
National Forest, many trail miles need improvement and restoration. The VGJ/SCC program will
establish fully qualified, self-sustaining veterans' corps to perform trail
enhancement/improvement project work.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Florida

 

Maintenance of Three Florida Trails for Safety and Protection

Estimated Funding: $ 950,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Counties: Lee and Marion

This project encompasses three heavily used hiking trails on the National Forests in Florida.
These trails require maintenance to insure resource protection and visitor safety. The Leon Sinks
Interpretive Trail is located on the Apalachicola National Forest. It spotlights the sinkholes and
aquifer characteristic of the area. There are numerous wooden boardwalks and viewing platforms
installed in order to protect the fragile environment of the sinks. These 20-year-old wooden
structures are in poor condition and in need of replacement. Lake Eaton Sinkhole Interpretive
Trail (#202) and Lake Eaton Interpretive Trail (#205) are located on the Ocala National Forest.
These two trails also have many old wooden structures such as viewing platforms, a series of
steps, and a fishing boardwalk that also need replacement. These heavily used interpretive trails
are very popular with school groups, families, and individual hikers. These projects will result in
safe public access to these popular areas and protection of sensitive environments.

Mountain Bike Trail Maintenance for Safety and Protection

Estimated Funding: $ 250,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
County: Leon

The Munson Hills Mountain Bike Trail is located on the Apalachicola National Forest. The 18-
mile Munson Hills Trail, being close to the capitol of Florida, is very popular with local riders,
runners, and walkers, as well as out-of-town visitors. It requires maintenance to ensure resource
protection and visitor safety. The trail system has recently had an apartment complex built
adjacent to it, so the popularity and use constantly increases. It has many maintenance needs
resulting from sandy soils, elevation changes, and heavy use. The sugar sand soil washes into the
dips or lower elevations along the trail making unpleasant and potentially unsafe riding
conditions. There have been numerous user-created trails that go around rough spots, spreading
the use into sensitive areas. This project will include blocking those user created trails and
adding tread material in order to protect the natural resources in the area. The City of Tallahassee
and area rider groups are partners.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Idaho


North Idaho Counties Trail Maintenance and Reconstruction

Estimated Funding: $ 5,315,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Idaho Department of Corrections, Back Country ATV Association, Inc., Northwest
Access Alliance, Student Conservation Corps, Selway Bitterroot Wilderness Foundation, Idaho
Department of Parks and Recreation, Northwest Youth Crew ;Idaho Panhandle Resource
Advisory Committee, Montana Youth Corps, Montana Conservation Corps
Counties: Boundary, Clearwater, Kootenai, Shoshone

This project improves trails that were adversely affected by a lack of adequate maintenance and
by wildfire. This will enhance public safety, improve watershed conditions and access to remote
areas of national forests. On the Idaho Panhandle National Forest, trail maintenance work in five
northern counties of Idaho will create dozens of jobs and improve the safety of the trails while
protecting the natural resources. On the Clearwater National Forrest, about 1,000 miles of trail
will get heavy maintenance, five trail and trail suspension bridges will be repaired, 20 miles of
unauthorized user-created trails will be rehabilitated, and throughout the counties the trail
corridors will be treated for invasive weeds. The project work will be done by a combination of
contracts and existing partnerships and agreements with the Conservation Corps, bringing
unemployed youth and young adults to jobs in the woods.

Nez Perce National Historic Trail Trails work

Estimated Funding: $ 240,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Nez Perce Tribe
County: Clearwater

Over the summer field season, the Nez Perce National Historic Trail improvement project will
hire unemployed youth and young adults -- including a youth group from the Nez Perce tribe –
for seasonal trail maintenance work. Over 100 miles of trail will be improved through efforts
such as clearing the trail, replacing hundreds of rotten, non-functioning water bars important for
erosion control, and removing downed timber and other vegetation. The Musselshell Trail Bridge
and the Weippe Boardwalk Bridge along the Nez Perce trail will be stabilized for visitor safety,
reduced erosion into nearby streams and protection of a fragile wetland environment in the area.
In addition restoration work improving the Weippe Boardwalk Bridge will improve the wheel
chair accessible segment of the trail, providing a unique experience for visitors of all mobility
skill levels. The project improves visitors' recreation experience, provides employment
opportunities and protects national forest resources on this National Landmark.

Payette National Forest Trail Maintenance Needed to Assure Visitor Safety and Resource Protection

Estimated Funding: $ 250,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Student Conservation Association, Northwest Youth Corps
County: Valley

On the Payette National Forest, many miles of trail have been made unusable in past years due to
a reduced ability to complete needed trail maintenance This project will fund postponed trail
maintenance on both motorized and non-motorized trails for visitor safety and natural resource
protection. Access into the Forest by the recreating public will be improved, and enhanced trails
will be safer for all users. It will also reduce erosion and environmental impacts, thereby
improving watersheds and fisheries in the area. Approximately 250 miles of trail will be
maintained, restoring a usable trail network and protecting past investments made in the forest’s
trail system. The project will use a combination of local contracting, Student Conservation Corps
crews and Northwest Youth Corps crews. This project will provide many employment
opportunities in Adams, Valley, Idaho and Washington Counties in Idaho, where unemployment
rates are high.

Boise National Forest Trail Maintenance for Visitor Safety and Resource Protection

Estimated Funding: $ 750,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation, Northwest Youth Corp, Idaho
Backcountry Horsemen, Boise and Squaw Butte Chapters
County: Gem

The Boise National Forest is considered "Boise's Backyard.” Trail use has increased due to the
fast population growth of the surrounding communities in Southwest Idaho. Normal budgets
have not been able to keep up with the maintenance associated with the greater number of users,
and repairs have been postponed until funding could be made available. Over 100 miles of
system trails will receive maintenance with this project. These maintenance activities will
improve public safety through improved trails, enhance recreation opportunities, reduce
environmental impacts, future maintenance costs, and the backlog of deferred maintenance.
Unemployment rates are high in Boise, Gem, Elmore, and Valley counties. It is anticipated that
the project will create many seasonal jobs and initiate multiple contracts, agreements, and
partnerships across the Boise National Forest. Not only does this project provide jobs across four
counties, but it also maintains recreational escapes within a 2-hour drive for the population of
Idaho’s capital city.


Forest-wide Trail Maintenance on Salmon-Challis Natl Forest, including Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness

Date of Announcement:
Estimated Funding: $ 803,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Idaho Outfitter and Guides Association members, Student Conservation Association,
Montana Conservation Corp, Idaho Backcountry Horsemen (multiple chapters), Idaho
Department of Parks and Recreation, Lemhi Youth Employment Program
County: Lemhi

The 3,380 miles of wilderness and non-wilderness trail in the Salmon-Challis National Forest are
the recreation destination choice for thousands each year. They provide a transportation network
for a healthy Outfitter and Guide industry, vital to the economy of these counties that exhibit
high unemployment rates. In recent years large wildfires and insect infestations have had a
serious impact on 60% of the forest’s trails. Thousands of trees have fallen and rock and
mudslides have made some sections impassable. This project would bring at least 100 miles of
trail up to standard, alleviating barriers to travel, improving water quality, improving public
safety, protecting habitat for Chinook salmon and steelhead trout, and mitigating impacts to
historic trails. The forest has strong working relationships with partnership groups and this
project would extend those relationships by providing jobs and numerous educational volunteer
opportunities. The project will be undertaken in difficult and remote terrain.

Caribou-Targhee Forest Trail Decommissioning Protects Resources

Estimated Funding: $ 230,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
County: Clark

Many portions of the Caribou-Targhee National Forest used to be open to cross country travel
with motorized vehicles. As a result, many unwanted, user-created trails were established. The
forest signed a new decision in May 2005 which closed all of the forest to motorized cross
country travel and designated certain trails that were open to motorized use. Despite closing
user-created paths, hundreds of miles of these illegal motorized trails still exist. Most of the
approximately 3,000,000 acres of the Forest contain user-created trails that are causing erosion,
vegetation damage and wildlife disturbances. There is an immediate need to decommission these
roads and trails. This forest-wide project will close access to 150 miles of user-created trails
through the use of gates, boulders, tree planting, ripping, re-contouring, etc. Temporary
employees will be hired to supplement existing forest crews and rental equipment will be
acquired through contracts.

Hells Canyon National Recreation Area and Eagle Cap Wilderness Trails Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 1,617,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Blue Mountain Backcountry Riders (LaGrande), Oregon Youth Conservation Corps
(Baker and Union counties)
County: Idaho

Trails within Hells Canyon National Recreation Area and the Eagle Cap Wilderness face major
ecological and safety issues due to years of weather damage, among other factors. These areas
are major tourism draws for local communities, and the use of trails and enjoyment of the areas
by visitors has benefits for local businesses. Jobs will be created to remove hazardous debris,
including downed logs, overgrown brush and other material along trails and in drainage systems.
This work will provide a safe corridor for trail users and will result in less ecological damage as
visitors will have no need to create trail bypasses.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Illinois

 

Phase 1 - Shawnee Designated Trail Improvements

Estimated Funding: $ 400,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
County: Pope

The Forest Service maintains trails to ensure resource protection and visitor safety. Trails are one
way the American public accesses the national forests and grasslands. This project involves trail
reconstruction work to eliminate $250,000 of deferred maintenance on existing and newly
designated non-motorized trails. Some are in federally designated wilderness areas on the
Shawnee National Forest in southern Illinois. Tasks include trail maintenance, reconstructing
trails, and replacing trail bridges to improve watershed health through reduction of erosion and
sedimentation. The Shawnee National Forest's trails program has been the subject of many
project appeals and lawsuits over the past decade, due to conflicts between equestrian groups and
other trail users. This work will accelerate some of the deferred maintenance backlog associated
with these trails, help to reduce user conflicts, and provide a safer trail environment.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Indiana

 

Forest-wide Trail Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 200,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
County: Monroe

Maintenance and reconstruction of hiking and equestrian trails will address severe and long-
standing erosion and sedimentation issues. Tasks include the cleaning and rebuilding of rolling
dip drainage structures, culvert repairs, brushing, and removing trees downed by recent ice
storms. Trail treads will be improved and hardened for all-weather use by laying down crushed
rock in low spots and eroded areas. In addition to eliminating $200,000 of deferred trail
maintenance, the project will provide a safer environment for the public and help to re-establish a
sustainable trail network on a significant portion of limited publicly accessible land in the state.
The work will be completed by the Youth Conservation Corp and also by contractors.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Michigan

 

Phase 1 - Trail Bridge Repair and Replacement

Estimated Funding: $ 500,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
County: Alger

The Forest Service maintains trails to ensure resource protection and visitor safety. Trails are the
way the American public accesses the national forests and grasslands. This project will improve
recreational opportunities and improve fish passage and transportation infrastructure in the
popular Grand Island Recreation Area in the Hiawatha National Forest. This project has two
components. The first component will replace a condemned bridge that serves as a critical east-
west trail link in Grand Island National Recreation Area. Work includes demolition of the old
bridge and installation of the replacement structure. The second component of the project will
replace deteriorated culverts on Rim Trail in Grand Island National Recreation Area. Work
includes removal and replacement of failed trail crossing culverts, trail surface replacement, and
stream bank stabilization. Overall this project will ensure healthy, sustainable conditions for
visitors to Grand Island Recreation Area and the aquatic species that inhabit it.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Minnesota

 

High Priority Region Wide Trail Projects

Estimated Funding: $ 3,926,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Hanging Rock All Terrain Vehicle Club, River Valley Mountain Bike Association
County: Saint Louis

The Forest Service maintains trails to ensure resource protection and visitor safety. Trails are the
way the American public accesses the national forests and grasslands. This project will repair
and maintain heavily used popular recreational trails in four states: Minnesota, Ohio, Illinois, and
Vermont. The project will provide jobs through a combination of contracts and agreements.
Crew leaders will be hired to supervise the work crews under agreement. Crews will repair,
reconstruct, or maintain high-priority hiking, cross-country skiing, off-road vehicle, equestrian
and snowmobile trails and will replace trail bridges on four national forests in the east.
Watershed health through the reduction of erosion and sedimentation will be improved. In
addition to providing direct benefits through hiring, indirect benefits include providing a safer
and more enjoyable recreational experience for trail users; increased tourism expenditures in
neighboring communities; improved forest health; and a greater connection to the outdoors for
the recreating public.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Missouri

 

Phase 1- Sustainable Trails (Manpower Partnerships)

Estimated Funding: $ 200,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: AmeriCorps, Ozark Trail Association
County: Saint Francois

This work will provide a safer environment and more enjoyable recreational experience for trail
users on the Mark Twain National Forest. In addition, this project will strengthen important
existing, working partnerships. It also eliminates $100,000 worth of deferred maintenance on
existing trails and addresses severe erosion and sedimentation issues. Part of this project will
supplement major trail maintenance and construction contributions by the Ozark Trail
Association (valued at $200,000 a year) with a small crew removing trees across trails and
diverting water from trail surfaces, thus minimizing erosion and preserving vegetation. The
project also makes it possible for AmeriCorps-St. Louis to maintain approximately 400 miles of
motorized hiking and equestrian trails for healthy, sustainable conditions for visitors to the
forest.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Montana

 

Northwest Montana Counties Trail Maintenance and Reconstruction 1

Estimated Funding: $ 2,995,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Student Conservation Association, Montana Conservation Corps
Counties: Flathead, Lincoln and Sanders

This project will provide benefits for resources and visitors and will create job opportunities on
the Flathead, Kootenai and Lolo National Forests. Montana Conservation Corps and Student
Conservation Association enrollees will be working on several of the projects which include
upgrading trail conditions and bridges which will, in turn, improve access, user safety and
recreation experiences. The Flathead National Forest project reduces a backlog of needed trail
maintenance and reconstruction on hundreds of miles of forest trails, including work on three
wilderness suspension bridges. The Lolo National Forest project funds the improvement and
maintenance of approximately 300 miles of trails which will improve visitor safety. The work
includes removing some trail sections from environmentally sensitive areas, replacing several
faulty trail bridges and stabilizing trailheads. The Kootenai National Forest projects include
heavy trail maintenance, a bridge replacement and a trail improvement to provide full
accessibility standards around Little Therriault Lake. All three forests will also maintain many
miles of trails and install trail signs throughout the forest for visitor safety.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Nevada

 

Mt Rose Wilderness Trails Maintenance and Stewardship

Estimated Funding: $ 150,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Great Basin Institute (Nevada Conservation Corps), Friends of Nevada Wilderness,
Youth Conservation Corps
County: Washoe

Mt. Rose Wilderness is a very popular and accessible recreation destination outside of Reno,
Nevada. This project will provide critical maintenance on many of the most heavily used trails
on the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest. Around 100,000 visitors annually enjoy this
extraordinary area. Correcting safety issues along those routes is particularly important. This
project will also help monitor and correct the resource impacts associated with this high
visitation rate. The project will be implemented by hiring young adults to work on a Nevada
Conservation Corps crew for the summer. The crew will benefit from the job skills learned, and
the environmental education gained from the project. Community volunteers, managed by a
volunteer coordinator hired by Friends of Nevada Wilderness, will leverage project funding.
Youth Conservation Corps recruits will also acquire valuable training and life skills during the
project. Providing these employment opportunities will be particularly valuable in Washoe
County, which has had some of the highest unemployment statistics in the Intermountain Region
of the Forest Service.

Spring Mountains National Recreation Area - Youth Employment Trails Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 250,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Great Basin Institute (Nevada Conservation Corps), Friends of Nevada Wilderness,
Youth Conservation Corps, Spring Mountains Youth Camp
County: Clark

The Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, located 35-minutes from downtown Las
Vegas, boasts a 103-mile trail system that provides an exciting escape from the city's heat and
hustle. High use (approximately 350,000 visitors annually), highly erosive soils, and intense
weather events create continual maintenance needs and a growing backlog of postponed trail
maintenance. This project will correct critical safety and natural resource-related maintenance
needs, and employ appropriate restoration measures. The project will be implemented through
multiple youth and young adult crews, Nevada Conservation Corps crew, Youth Conservation
Corps (YCC) crew, and Friends of Nevada Wilderness volunteer crews. Crew managers will be
hired for both the YCC and volunteer crews. Also, this project will fund crews from Spring
Mountains Youth Camp, a long-term partner that rehabilitates at-risk teens. These crews will
benefit from the employment, job skills, and environmental education gained from the project.
Creating these jobs will be particularly valuable in Clark County, which has been severely
impacted by the economic downturn.

Humboldt - Toiyabe National Forest - Trails Maintenance and Wilderness Stewardship

Estimated Funding: $ 140,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Great Basin Institute (Nevada Conservation Corps), Friends of Nevada Wilderness
Counties: Lander and Nye

The Wilderness areas of Alta Toquima, Arc Dome, Table Mountain, Grant Range, and Quinn
Canyon are all located in Nye and Lincoln Counties in central and southern Nevada. These
Wilderness areas have extensive trail systems that are in critical need of maintenance on many
neglected sections, as well as better information and signs at trailheads. This project will increase
visitor safety with improved trails and informational signs, as well as monitor and correct natural
resource impacts by removing and restoring inappropriate campsites and motorized incursion
tracks. The project will be implemented by young-adult crews of the Nevada Conservation Corps
(NCC), in coordination with Friends of Nevada Wilderness. The Humboldt-Toiyabe National
Forest has strong partnerships with these groups and can efficiently implement this project
through agreements. Young adults will benefit from the employment, job skills, and the
environmental education gained from the project. Community volunteers, managed by a
volunteer coordinator hired by Friends of Nevada Wilderness, will further leverage project
funding.

Non-Motor/Non-Wilderness Trails

Estimated Funding: $ 9,673,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Nevada Conservation Corps, California Conservation Corps, Student Conservation
Association, AmeriCorps, Back Country Horsemen of America, Tahoe Rim Trail Association,
Pacific Crest Trail Association, Town of Mammoth, Federal Highway Administration
States: California, Nevada
Counties: California: Butte, Calaveras, Del Norte, El Dorado, Humboldt, Kern, Lassen, Mono,
Plumas, Sierra, Siskiyou, Trinity, Tuolumne, Yuba. Nevada: Douglas

This project involves trail repair and reconstruction of heavily used, non-motorized trails on
national forests throughout California. Trails provide a gateway for visitors, both young and old,
to experience the outdoors and connect with nature. Trails in poor condition can erode to the
point of being impassible, causing sedimentation in nearby streams and preventing access to
public lands. Much needed trail repair work will be completed through this project with a variety
of local partners, including young adults involved with the network of Conservation Corps
throughout California. These young adults will be involved in labor-intensive trail work while
developing vital trade skills and a land conservation ethic. The project includes making select
trails accessible to people with disabilities. It also involves work on the popular Pacific Crest
National Recreation Trail. The public will benefit from improved trail access and the health
benefits associated with hiking and connecting to the outdoors.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

New Mexico

 

Lincoln National Forest Trail Maintenance Backlog

Estimated Funding: $ 350,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Rails-to-Trails, Student Conservation Corps
Counties: Chaves, Eddy, Lincoln and Otero

The Lincoln National Forest has 466 miles of motorized and nonmotorized trails open to a
variety of recreational uses ranging from hiking and horseback riding to motorcycling and all-
terrain vehicle use. This project will allow the forest to maintain 50-70 miles (10-15% total) of
trail and install new or improved trail signs on all three ranger districts. Implementation of the
Travel Management Rule, including the Lincoln Travel Analysis Process and subsequent public
involvement, has identified the highest priority trails needing improvements. The work will
result in significant improvement to recreation user safety and enjoyment, as well as the
management investment ensuring higher level trail conditions into the future.

Cibola National Forest Trail Maintenance and Construction

Estimated Funding: $ 260,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: New Mexico Off Highway Vehicle Alliance, Friends of Sandia Mountain, FooMTB
Trail Partners, Southwest Conservation Corps
Counties: Bernalillo, Cibola, McKinley and Socorro

This project includes both trail construction and maintenance throughout the Cibola National
Forest. Trail construction includes trails approved in the Sandia Ranger District Travel
Management decision, which responds to the need for an overall designated travel system to
protect forest resources from unregulated off highway vehicle use, while providing quality
motorized recreation opportunities. Trail maintenance includes trails managed for motorcycle
and mountain bike use in the Cedro area in Bernalillo County with additional trail maintenance
in the Sandia and Manzano Mountain, Apache Kid and Withington Wildernesses for hiking and
equestrian use. This will provide quality recreation trails for forest visitors, and will benefit the
nearby communities who use these trails. The majority of the work would be completed by the
Southwest Conservation Corps (SCC), a non-profit agency that provides young women and men
with structured, safe, and challenging work and educational opportunities through employment
projects, including trail work.

Continental Divide National Scenic Trail and Pecos Wilderness Trails Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 100,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: YCC, Temporary employees, contracts, volunteer groups
Counties: Taos

This project will involve trail maintenance on the Continental Divide Trail and trails in the Pecos
Wilderness to insure visitor safety and resource protection. The trail maintenance work will
include removing trees blown down on trails, improving drainage structures, trail signing, and
providing informational and educational kiosks at trail heads. The project will protect the
investment in the existing trail system, provide safe enjoyment to the public and provide for
resource protection of the public lands and waters by reducing soil erosion, improving watershed
conditions and improving water quality. This work will be done with local partners, hiring of
temporary crews, and volunteer groups. There will be direct benefit to the local communities by
hiring from the local community and to support these crews for supplies, fuel, and other
incidentals.

Trail Bridge Replacement for Goose Lake Trail, Red River / Rio Grande Bridge and Trail 24

Estimated Funding: $ 100,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Counties: Taos

This project entails surveying, designing and constructing a replacement trail bridge and supports
for the Goose Lake Trail and for Trail 24 on the Pecos Wilderness. This project also includes the
survey and design for the supports for an existing bridge to be placed over the Red River/Rio
Grande Rivers. These bridges will provide safe passage for the public along these trails. This
project will provide direct economic support to the local community through the hiring of local
workers and additional benefit to the local communities to support the contractor for supplies,
fuel, food and other incidentals.

Identify, locate and interpret the Camino Real and Old Spanish National Historic Trails

Estimated Funding: $ 100,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: BLM, Rio Grande National Forest, Old Spanish Trail society
Counties: Taos

This project will boost the local tourism economy in Northern New Mexico by providing more
information about the region’s history. The project will increase the interpretive and educational
opportunities to the visiting public to understand how the Spanish settlers traveled through
northern New Mexico as they traveled westward to California. It involves conducting archival
research and initial field work to validate the location of the Old Spanish National Historic Trail,
as well as providing interpretive information for both the Old Spanish Trail and the Camino Real
Trail. Information kiosks would be constructed and installed at key points along the trails.
Increasing the variety and broad nature of activities enjoyed by the visitors to northern New
Mexico will help establish a more stable tourism economy in the local communities.

145 Miles of Trail Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 308,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Southwest Conservation Corps, The Wellness Coalition
Counties: Catron, Grant and Sierra

Many trails are impassable or difficult to locate. Opening trails would provide safe passage to
inaccessible areas, provide administrative access, and improve resource conditions by stabilizing
treads and preventing user created trails by hikers and horseback riders seeking to avoid
impassable areas. This project will significantly reduce the backlog of deferred trail maintenance
on approximately 145 miles of trail. The maintenance will be accomplished through agreements
with youth groups, young adult groups, and private trails organizations. These groups provide
training and employment for youth and young adults in outdoor conservation activities including
trail maintenance, wilderness camping, tool use and “leave no trace” ethics.

185 Miles of Trail Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 411,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Southwest Conservation Corps, The Wellness Coalition
Counties: Catron, Grant and Sierra

Many trails are impassable or difficult to locate. Opening trails would provide safe passage to
inaccessible areas, provide administrative access, and improve resource conditions by stabilizing
treads and preventing user created trails by hikers and horseback riders seeking to avoid
impassable areas. This project will significantly reduce the backlog of deferred trail maintenance
on approximately 185 miles of trail. The maintenance will be accomplished through agreements
with youth groups and private trails organizations. These groups provide training and
employment for youth groups, young adult groups and private organizations in outdoor
conservation activities including trail maintenance, wilderness camping, tool use and “leave no
trace” ethics.

107 Miles of Trail Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 290,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Southwest Conservation Corps, The Wellness Coalition
Counties: Catron, Grant and Sierra

Many trails are impassable or difficult to locate. Opening trails would provide safe passage to
inaccessible areas, provide administrative access, and improve resource conditions by stabilizing
treads and preventing user created trails by hikers and horseback riders seeking to avoid
impassable areas. This project will significantly reduce the backlog of deferred trail maintenance
on approximately 107 miles of trail. Contracts would be awarded within 120 days of notification
and implemented as field conditions permit. Several miles of trail are within designated
wilderness and at higher elevations that are only accessible during short parts of the year.

39 miles of Trail Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 187,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Southwest Conservation Corps, The Wellness Coalition
Counties: Catron, Grant and Sierra

Many trails are impassable or difficult to locate. Opening trails would provide safe passage to
inaccessible areas, provide administrative access, and improve resource conditions by stabilizing
treads and preventing user created trails by hikers and horseback riders seeking to avoid
impassable areas. This project will significantly reduce the backlog of deferred trail maintenance
on approximately 39 miles of trail. The maintenance will be accomplished through agreements
with youth groups, and private trails organizations. These groups provide training and
employment for youth and young adults in outdoor conservation activities including trail
maintenance, wilderness camping, tool use and “leave no trace” ethics.

Trail Maintenance on the Continental Divide

Estimated Funding: $ 197,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Counties: Catron

This project involves the construction of 34 miles on the Continental Divide National Scenic
Trail (CDT) through the northern end of the forest. The completion of the 34 miles will add to
the approximately 230 miles of CDT on the forest. This project would also reduce the backlog
of deferred trail maintenance on about 17.5 miles. Opening trails would provide safe passage to
inaccessible areas, provide administrative access, and improve resource conditions by stabilizing
treads and preventing user created trails by hikers and horseback riders seeking to avoid
impassable areas.

Forest-wide Trail Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $145,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Student Conservation Association (SCA), Rocky Mountain Youth Core, Southwest
Conservation Core, New Mexico Mountain Club, Continental Divide Trail Alliance, New
Mexico Volunteers for the Outdoors, Back Country Horsemen
Counties: Rio Arriba

In recent years, heavy snow combined with high wind has caused considerable blowdown of
trees and has increased the workload and cost of trail maintenance. This project would resolve
$90,000 in deferred maintenance on Forest trails, insuring visitor safety and resource protection.

Dry Canyon Trailhead/Crossings

Estimated Funding: $100,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Counties: Otero

Dry Canyon, located on the western edge of the Sacramento Ranger District and immediately
adjacent to Highway 82, is an area used by many people to target practice, to picnic and camp, to
access trails and roads and for livestock grazing and gathering. It is subject to resource damage
from overuse by motorized traffic and trash. Some improvements have been made to decrease
erosion and direct access but increased use has resulted in continued degradation of the site.
Litter from ammunition casings, broken glass, and a variety of items used as targets has become
unsafe and unsightly. This project will review and implement an existing site plan resulting in a
significant improvement to recreation user safety and enjoyment, as well as a reduction in
resource damage and litter.

Mexican Canyon Trestle Overlook, Interpretation and Trail Planning and Design

Estimated Funding: $250,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partner: NM Rails-to-Trails Assn., Village of Cloudcroft, various individuals
County: Otero

A scenic overlook with parking, interpretive signs, and trail system will be planned and designed
for viewing the restored Mexican Canyon Trestle. Adjacent to Highway 82 and listed on the
National Register of Historic Places, the Mexican Canyon Trestle is a beloved landmark,
symbolic of the Sacramento Mountains railroad logging history. The Trestle draws visitors to the
Village of Cloudcroft, sustaining and improving revenue to the many small businesses in the
village. Currently, visitors park on the highway shoulder, creating a safety hazard and causing
resource damage. No interpretive information is available at the site. The interpretive message
developed through this solicitation will make history come alive for tourists and locals alike. The
overlook, interpretive features and trail will allow hikers and visitors to get a closer look at the
Trestle. This project provides the plans for future construction of this highly visible tourist
attraction. Trail work will be initiated.

Three Rivers Trail Repair

Estimated Funding: $ 250,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Counties: Otero

The Three Rivers Trail (TR44) is located within the White Mountain Wilderness along the west
side of the Smokey Bear Ranger District. Trail 44 provides the primary access for the general
public and receives the heaviest use. The southwest portion of the wilderness is heavily used for
both foot and equestrian traffic. In 2008 Hurricane Dolly, and the subsequent flooding that
followed, obliterated approximately three miles of the trail which required relocation and
reconstruction work to reconnect the upper and lower portions of the trial. All trail work within
the wilderness will be accomplished using hand tools. The following work is needed both for
visitor safety and to protect resources: logging and brushing trail to accommodate people and
horses, tread reconstruction or relocation, reestablish signs and build rock cairns to identify trail
location, three miles of trail maintenance
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

North Carolina


Tellico Off Highway Vehicle Area Restoration - Aquatic Resource Monitoring

Estimated Funding: $ 460,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, North Carolina Division of Water
Quality, Tennessee Valley Authority
County: Cherokee

This project involves implementation of a resource monitoring plan to evaluate the effects of
Forest Service management actions on aquatic habitat and associated water quality and quantity
within the Tellico watershed. This work will include field data collection and physical
measurements of stream channels, including changes in fish populations. Monitoring will
evaluate the success or failure of management decisions and guide future actions in the Tellico
Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) area. Multiple partners are involved, including the Tennessee
Valley Authority, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, who will assist with trout
population monitoring and the North Carolina Division of Water Quality, which will conduct
aquatic macroinvertebrate monitoring. These efforts are part of the larger effort to monitor
conditions on the Tellico OHV area and restore the health of the landscape.

National Forests in North Carolina Trail and Bridge Maintenance for Safety and Resource Protection

Estimated Funding: $ 4,925,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Eastern Band of the Cherokee
Counties: Carteret, Cherokee, Macon, Madison, Mitchell, Montgomery, County; Swain,
Transylvania, Yancey

This project encompasses a variety of trail or trail bridge maintenance activities across the
National Forests in North Carolina which will increase visitor safety while ensuring resource
protection. Work to be accomplished includes restoration and mitigation of resource damage in
Upper Tellico, rehabilitation and replacement of trail bridges at end of their service life,
rehabilitation of the popular Roan Mountain Trail, which includes replacement of a raised
viewing platform in bad repair, the repaving of the Forest Discovery Trail at the Cradle of
Forestry, and deferred maintenance activities on forest hiking, biking, equestrian and off
highway vehicle trails. This maintenance work will improve visitor safety and access to the
forest and reduce erosion by restoring drainage and stabilizing trails.

North Carolina National Forests Trail Bridges Safety Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 625,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Counties: Macon and Swain

To ensure resource protection and visitor safety, trail bridges across the National Forests in
North Carolina will be rehabilitated, repaired or replaced by this project. These trails and
associated bridges provide hiking and biking access to many visitors. Replacing unsafe bridges
and addressing the deferred maintenance will improve the safety of visitors and their experience.
Some of these bridges may improve accessibility.


Roan Mountain Trails Safety Rehabilitation

Estimated Funding: $ 300,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
County: Mitchell

This project will rehabilitate and repave the existing trail from the upper parking lot near the
Visitor Center to the elevated platform or observation deck, increasing the trail's safety and
reducing erosion and sedimentation. The existing observation deck has reached the end of its
service life and is beginning to pose some safety issues. It will be replaced in-kind.
Implementation of this project will result in better accessibility and improved safety.

Improving Accessibility on the Forest Discovery Trail at the Cradle of Forestry

Estimated Funding: $ 350,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Cradle of Forestry in America Interpretive Association
County: Transylvania

This 2-mile trail follows a grassy road bed through the woods at the Cradle of Forestry. A guided
walk along this trail offers visitors a lengthy immersion into the forest. However, it is not
wheelchair accessible. Portions of the trail have reached the end of their service life and are in
need of repair. Paving this trail will improve accessibility and will continue to provide
interpretive learning opportunities for all visitors.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Oregon


Oregon Youth Employment Initiative - Phase II

Estimated Funding: $ 3,000,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development, Oregon Youth
Conservation Corps, Business Education Compact, Association of Oregon Counties, Oregon
Department of Education, Office of the Governor of Oregon, Northwest Youth Corps
Counties: statewide

Phase II of the Oregon Youth Employment Initiative is an inter-governmental proposal that
continues and expands the work initiated and implemented in Phase I. This proposal uses
existing organizational infrastructure and programs to deliver a state-wide youth employment
program focused on natural resource conservation and restoration on public and private lands.
An existing Oregon Youth Conservation Corp (OYCC) agreement for Phase I will be modified
to include these funds. The employment experience covers two program areas. The summer
program would provide work for youth crews, supervisors and employment coordinators. During
the school year, school districts would employ youth in conjunction with existing school
programs, existing Job Corps programs, and potentially expand the current Outdoor School
Program. This project will be steered and led by five organizations: Oregon Youth Conservation
Corp, Business Education Compact, Association of Oregon Counties, Oregon Department of
Education, Northwest Youth Corps, and representative from the Office of the Governor.

Umatilla National Forest Trails Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 3,000,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Backcountry Horsemen, Northwest Trail Riders
States: Oregon, Washington
Counties: Oregon: Grant, Morrow, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa. Washington: Asotin, Columbia, Garfield

Backlog maintenance will be reduced on motorized and non-motorized trails on the Umatilla
National Forest. Additionally, several key trail bridges will be replaced. Trails will be maintained
to the standard for their intended use, providing access to users and protecting the environment.
Some of the trails are located in designated wildernesses or other remote, mostly non-motorized
backcountry. Other trails are located in mostly motorized front country. Activities include trail
brushing, tread work, drainage structure restoration and bridge maintenance performed by hand
and mechanically. Three of the bridge replacements are located in the North Fork John Day
Wilderness. One bridge replacement is on a motorized trail.

Pacific Crest Trail Maintenance - Oregon and Washington

Estimated Funding: $ 1,860,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Pacific Crest Trail Association, Washington Trails Association, Pacific Northwest
Trail Association, Student Conservation Association, Backcountry Horsemen,
AmeriCorps/Northwest Service Academy
States: Oregon, Washington
Counties: Oregon: Clackamas, Deschutes, Douglas, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Klamath,
Lane, Linn, Multnomah, Wasco. Washington: Chelan, King, Kittitas, Lewis, Okanogan, Pierce,
Skagit, Skamania, Snohomish, Whatcom, Yakima

Youth crews will be employed on multiple projects to clear and maintain the Pacific Crest
National Scenic Trail which crosses the states of Oregon and Washington from north to south,
roughly following the Cascade Mountains crest. Basic maintenance includes clearing overgrown
brush, tree and rock removal, water bar repairs and light ditching. In some instances, heavier trail
maintenance or reconstruction may be required depending upon winter damage. The Pacific
Crest Trail Association, our major partner, will supervise the technical trail work. Benefits of the
trail maintenance work will provide clear and safer passage for both long-distance and short
interval travelers.

Mt. Hood National Forest Trail Restoration for Public Access and Safety

Estimated Funding: $ 1,400,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: AmeriCorps, Association of Northwest Steelheaders, Mt. Hood Kiwanis Camp,
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife, Urban League of Portland, Youth Employment Institute
County: Clackamas

Every year the many miles of trails in popular Mt. Hood National Forest serve thousands of
hikers and other visitors. Just like roads, trails need to be maintained. Storms, fast-growing
vegetation and recreational use all take their toll on these trails. This project includes work to
refurbish and repair trails for hikers’ safety. This project utilizes the support of the forest's many
partners. Caring for trails through this project provides employment, supports public safety, and
protects ecosystems by minimizing sedimentation through proper trail maintenance. This project
would also generate additional revenues for local communities as hikers and recreationists stop
to buy supplies on the way to or from their outdoor adventures.

Ochoco National Forest Trail Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 525,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Counties: Crook, Jefferson, Wheeler

The more desirable Forest trails and facilities are, the more they are enjoyed by hikers who also
spend tourism money in local communities for lodging, food, or supplies. This project will use
youth crews employed on multiple projects to repair trails and provide needed maintenance so
that visitors can safely enjoy overlooks and recreational campgrounds. The Ochoco National
Forest is full of wildlife, from elk and turkey to wild horses. Trails in this forest connect people;
local or urban visitors; with recreational campsites and nature at every elevation from low to
alpine. These trails need to be maintained so people can use them and resources can be protected.
Jobs created by this project will keep trails in good condition, promote public safety, and protect
the forest.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Pennsylvania


Forest-wide Trail Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 2,900,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Student Conservation Association
County: Elk

Tread and water crossing maintenance on North Country National Scenic Trails will enhance
public safety, watershed protection, and hiker satisfaction. This project will provide additional
trail and structural maintenance and replacements on non-wilderness pedestrian trails --
particularly bridges, and culverts on hiking and cross-country ski trails. These projects will
enhance safety, improved infrastructure, and encourage the public's use of the outdoors for health
benefits. This project includes restoration work on Spring Creek and Hickory Wilderness horse
trail systems. Through the restoration work, these trails will be brought to standard for watershed
protection, wilderness values, public safety, and forest health.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Puerto Rico


El Yunque National Forest Historic Trails Preservation

Estimated Funding: $ 700,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
County: Rio Grande Municipio

This portion of the trails system on the El Yunque National Forest was constructed in the 1930s
by the Civilian Conservation Corps. These historic hiking trails were built by hand, include many
areas of rock work, and were labor-intensive to construct. After years of wear, some sections are
starting to loose integrity and need erosion control to prevent sedimentation runoff. Preservation
work will include general maintenance, stabilizing eroded areas, masonry rock work, and re-
building drainage structures. Reconstruction activities are expected to require a sizeable
unskilled labor force. Completion of this project should preserve this historic aspect of the
National Forest, reduce maintenance needs, and enhance the safety of visitors.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Tennessee


Waterfall Trails Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 350,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Counties: Carter, Cocke, Greene, Johnson, Monroe, Polk, Unicoi

Waterfalls are popular visitor destinations on the Cherokee National Forest, and the trails leading
to these falls are heavily used and in places are in poor condition, increasing the risk of hikers
falling. These waterfall trails are major destinations supporting tourism in the surrounding
communities. This project is expected to address needed work on 20 or more of these trails and
will include maintenance activities, erosion control, replacement of steps, handrail
reconstruction, and other general repairs. Work will be accomplished primarily by hand labor
using local contractors. Completion of this work would improve visitor access to and safety on
these natural attractions and other regional sightseeing destinations.

Land Between The Lakes Trail Bridge Replacements and Trail Reconstruction

Estimated Funding: $ 500,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
County: Stewart

Efforts will be concentrated on replacing small foot bridges and reconstructing needed trail
segments in the areas of the Prior Creek Watershed, Brandon Spring Group Camp, and Fort
Henry Hiking Trail System. Such maintenance ensures visitor safety and resource protection. In
addition, several hiking/biking/birding trails, interpretive pull-offs, raised wetland boardwalks
and observation blinds have been identified for maintenance in the Prior Creek area and will
complement the existing Stewart County trail systems within Land Between The Lakes (LBL).
Trails provide for one of the most popular activities at LBL. Improving trails will result in better
visitor safety and access within LBL, and will result in an overall increase in visitation, thus
boosting the economy in gateway communities.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Virginia


George Washington and Jefferson National Forests Trail and Trail Bridge Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 1,890,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Counties: Grayson and Washington

This project entails multiple small works bundled together to reconstruct, relocate and maintain
trails, provide trailhead maintenance, and provide trail bridge maintenance or replacement across
national forest lands in Virginia. Such work increases visitor safety and protects resources.
Trailhead maintenance will include new gravel, while the trail work will be heavy maintenance
such as: re-establishing tread, brushing, clearing, replacing water control measures such as dips
and water bars, clearing culverts, and barricading user-created shortcuts at switchbacks along
foot, equestrian, off highway vehicle, and mountain bike trails. Trail bridges will receive
maintenance or be replaced, as needed. Several condemned structures will be demolished to
restore the trail corridor and provide for public safety on tracts purchased for the Appalachian
National Scenic Trail. The majority of work will be done by hand or with a trail dozer. The
Student Conservation Association, Youth Conservation Corps, Virginia Tech University
students, and American Hiking Society are likely partners. This project will result in a
sustainable trails network maintained as needed, improved visitor experience, better signs along
the trails, improved public safety and watershed protection.

Repair and Maintenance of the Virginal Creeper Trail Protects Visitors

Estimated Funding: $ 1,100,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Virginia Creeper Trail Club
Counties: Grayson and Washington

The Virginia Creeper Trail, near Damascus, is a premier National Recreation Trail and provides
opportunities for mountain bikers, horse riders, and hikers to enjoy the beautiful scenery along a
converted former railroad bed. It offers an excellent method of encouraging families to enjoy
their national forests. However it is important they are able to do so safely. Most of the trestles
on this old rail system are original and in need of heavy repair and maintenance. Some of the
trestle foundations are in flash-flood prone areas, receiving a lot of pressure. Under this project,
these foundations will be reinforced, with decking and hand rail maintenance as well. The 18-
mile segment managed by the Forest Service has six outfitter guides that rent out mountain bikes
and offer shuttle service. The Virginia Creeper Trail Club is a managing partner. The work will
improve public safety, sustain this important trail system, increase accessibility by wheelchairs,
and assist in maintaining the economic viability of several local communities.

Bridge Replacements Make Trails Safer and Accessible

Estimated Funding: $ 275,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Appalachian Trail Conservancy, Roanoke Appalachian Trail Club
Counties: Bath, Bland, Lee, Page

Bridge replacements made through this project will increase public safety and make trails more
accessible to people with disabilities. Replacements will occur on the Appalachian National
Scenic Trail (one bridge), Virginia Highlands Horse Trail (two bridges), Lake Keokee (seven
bridges), Hidden Valley West and Beards Mountain (one bridge each). The bridge on the
Appalachian Trail has been demolished due to safety hazards, so that construction will be a top
priority. By replacing the bridges at Lake Keokee, that trail will become wheelchair accessible.
The suspension bridge on Beards Mountain will also undergo some shoreline protection work.
After this work is completed, public safety will be improved, watersheds will be better protected,
deferred maintenance will be addressed and accessibility will be improved.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Washington


Umatilla National Forest Trails Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 3,000,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Backcountry Horsemen, Northwest Trail Riders
States: Oregon, Washington
Counties: Oregon: Grant, Morrow, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa. Washington: Asotin, Columbia,
Garfield

Backlog maintenance will be reduced on motorized and non-motorized trails on the Umatilla
National Forest. Additionally, several key trail bridges will be replaced. Trails will be maintained
to standard for their intended use, providing access to users and protecting the environment.
Some of the trails are located in designated wildernesses or other remote, mostly non-motorized
backcountry. Other trails are located in mostly motorized front country. Activities include trail
brushing, tread work, drainage structure restoration and bridge maintenance performed by hand
and mechanically. Three of the bridge replacements are located in the North Fork John Day
Wilderness. One bridge replacement is on a motorized trail.

Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest Trail and Facilities Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 1,212,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Washington Trails Association, Pacific Northwest Trails Association, Northwest
Youth Corps, International District Housing Authority, Volunteers for Outdoor Washington,
Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, Washington State Parks and Recreation Department
County: King

This project includes maintenance and renovation of trails and developed recreation sites on the
Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Employment opportunities will be created.. Federal
funds will be leveraged with other non-profit partners to maximize the number of job
opportunities. The deferred maintenance backlog for the forest will be significantly reduced by
work in developed sites and work on miles of forest trails. Working with our partners, young
people will be employed and exposed to natural resource ethics while making developed
recreation sites and trails safer and more accessible for all users.

Pacific Crest Trail Maintenance - Oregon and Washington

Estimated Funding: $ 1,860,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Pacific Crest Trail Association, Washington Trails Association, Pacific Northwest
Trail Association, Student Conservation Association, Backcountry Horsemen,
AmeriCorps/Northwest Service Academy
States: Oregon, Washington
Counties: Oregon: Clackamas, Deschutes, Douglas, Hood River, Jackson, County; Jefferson,
Klamath, Lane, Linn, Multnomah, Wasco. Washington: Chelan, King, Kittitas, Lewis,
Okanogan, Pierce, Skagit, Skamania, Snohomish, Whatcom, Yakima

Youth crews will be employed on multiple projects to clear and maintain the Pacific Crest
National Scenic Trail which crosses the states of Oregon and Washington from north to south
roughly following the Cascade Mountains crest. Basic maintenance includes clearing overgrown
brush, tree and rock removal, water bar repairs and light ditching. In some instances, heavier trail
maintenance or reconstruction may be required depending upon winter damage. The Pacific
Crest Trail Association, our major partner, will supervise the technical trail work. Benefits of the
trail maintenance work will provide clear and safer passage for both long-distance and short
interval travelers.

Olympic National Forest Deferred Trail Maintenance

Estimated Funding: $ 600,000 for Capital Improvement and Maintenance
Partners: Washington Conservation Corps, Student Conservation Association
Counties: Clallam, Grays Harbor, Jefferson, Mason

Every year the miles of trails within the Olympic National Forest serve hundreds of forest
visitors. The trails also take an annual beating from major winter storms which create erosion,
affect water quality, and cause resource damage. Just like roads, trails need to be tended and
maintained and storms, fast-growing vegetation and use take their toll. This small but important
project directly maintains the usability and safety of public trails in the forest while employing
people as immediately as possible and leveraging our local partners’ contributions. The project
addresses deferred maintenance and improving trail conditions. It repairs the Big Creek Trail
bridge damaged by a 2007 storm, upgrades trail signs and kiosks to provide educational
information addressing hiker safety, and resource protection; and reduces erosion and
sedimentation.



x Read more about the ARRA, federal budgets, and funding for trails at www.AmericanTrails.org/support.

x Read more about current funding for trails, parks, outdoor recreation, and federal land management on the American Trails website:

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