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18th National Trails Symposium Quad Cities October 19-22, 2006

Concurrent Sessions
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22 ~ Time: 10:45 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

See the full list of over 50 educational sessions and mini-workshops and bios of speakers

SESSIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

WHAT'S NEW: FOREST SERVICE TECHNOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT TRAILS PROJECTS
Location: Wabash & Wisconsin Rivers Room - Time: Sunday 10:45-12:00 p.m.

Missoula and San Dimas T&D Centers have several new projects to talk about. These include a mountain bike trail DVD; ATV rock rake; ATV Impact Study; Accessibility Guide to Outdoor Recreation and Trails; accessible gate designs; equestrian trail and facility guidelines; and more. We'll give a brief overview of each project, plus a more detailed discussion of A User's Guide to Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Trail Bridges. This will include information about composite materials, planning, ordering, installation, inspection, maintenance, and case studies of fiberglass trail bridges.

Speakers: James Scott Groenier, Project Leader, USFS, MTDC; Brian Vachowski, Program Leader, USFS, MTDC

THE ART & SCIENCE OF SUSTAINABLE HIGH USE TRAILS
Location: Arkansas & Platte Rivers Room - Time: Sunday 10:45-12:00 p.m.

Art - Successful Tools & Techniques from the Sketchbook process will be highlighted. Developed by trail professionals, the Sketchbook process is intended to assist non-profit and land-management agency personnel alike, strengthening the decision making process with professional project management principles to help ensure wise expenditure of funds with minimized impact to resources. Science - This presentation will summarize recent research regarding Best Management Practices for the design and maintenance of trails, particularly those that receive horse and ATV use. Findings from research on the Hoosier National Forest (Indiana) and the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area (Tennessee) will be presented

Moderator: Les Wadzinski, Recreation Program Manager, Hoosier National Forest

Speakers: Les Wadzinski, Recreation Program Manager, Hoosier National Forest; Jeff Marion, Scientist, U.S. Geological Survey and Adjunct Professor with the College of Natural Resources, Recreation Resource Management program, Virginia Tech; Hugh Duffy, Project Manager, National Park Service

KEEPING THE REGION UNITED AND THE PROCESS MOVING FORWARD NOW THAT THE MONEY IS GONE
Location: Ohio & Illinois Rivers Room - Time: Sunday 10:45-12:00 p.m.

Over the past five years, the Community Foundation for Southeastern Michigan's GreenWays Initiative has provided matching funds, hosted regional events, and served as the catalyst in creating greenways opportunities in southeast Michigan investing $25 million in the design, planning and construction of greenways, the training and institutional development for community leaders, and the education of the public about the benefits of greenways. And now that the money is gone, what happens next? Attend this session to find out the next steps being taken by The GreenWays Initiative to produce a regional greenways plan, and to set greenways priorities for both local leaders and public funding sources.

Speakers: Tom Woiwode, Director, GreenWays Initiative, Community Foundation for Southeastern Michigan; Robert Searns, Trail Development Consultant, Greenway Team, Inc. and Chair, American Trails Board

WATER TRAILS ACROSS THE NATION: DEVELOPMENT, RECOGNITION AND OPERATIONS
Location: Wapsipinicom & Des Moines Rivers Room - Time: Sunday 10:45-12:00 p.m.

Come learn about the growth of water trails across our nation with the focus being on the Captain John Smith National Historic Water Trail and the Northwest Discovery Water Trail. Three water trail advocates will describe their successes in promoting and developing two of our nation's premier water trails. In order to fund and complete water trails, a strong vision, development of citizen and agency support, partnerships, unending persistence and creativity are all critical. Benefits of water trails are many and you will learn how water trails have positive ecological, economic and cultural benefits by connecting people to waterways.

Moderator: Peter M. Hark, Management Analyst, Minnesota DNR - Trails and Waterways

Speakers: Phil Benge, Senior Natural Resource Specialist, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; Jamie Mierau, Associate Director of Outreach, American Rivers; Joe Sobinovsky, Statewide Trails Coordinator, Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission

TAKE PRIDE IN AMERICA® AND TREAD LIGHTLY!®: STEWARDSHIP AND RECREATION
Location: Missouri & Iowa Rivers Room - Time: Sunday 10:45-12:00 p.m.

Both Tread Lightly!‚ and Take Pride in America‚ promote stewardship and land ethics in recreation through outreach and volunteerism. We are learning it is not just the message that is important but its packaging. By developing education, communication, and volunteer programs targeted to different audiences the goal is to reach as many outdoor enthusiasts as possible, instill a sense of ownership in the Nation's natural resources and change behavior to practices that protect our recreational opportunities. This session will focus on the strategies and programs both organizations utilize to meet these goals.

Speakers: Mary Van Buren, Education and Program Specialist, Tread Lightly! and Michelle Cangelosi, Executive Director, Take Pride in America, U.S. Department of the Interior

THE NATIONAL TRAILS SYSTEM TODAY: PARTNERSHIPS THAT WORK
Location: Bettendorf Room - Time: Sunday 10:45-12:00 p.m.

This panel discussion will offer an overview of the National Trails System: 24 National Scenic and Historic Trails (totaling over 42,000 miles in combined lengths) and almost 1000 National Recreation Trails (an additional 9,000 miles). Participants will come away with updated knowledge about many of the important aspects of the National Trails System: what funding sources have proven most helpful to trail partners, what guiding principles shape this national system and may be applicable with their trails or trail systems, how recognition at the local level can be helpful, and how they can get involved as volunteers or advocates.

Moderator: Steve Elkinton, Program Leader, National Trails System Program, National Park Service

Speakers: Gary Werner, Executive Director, the Partnership for the National Trails System; Deb Salt, National Trails Coordinator, Bureau of Land Management; Jonathan Stephens, Congressionally Designated Areas, USDA Forest Service; Cherri Espersen, NRT Coordinator, RTCA Program, National Park Service

MANAGING USER CONFLICT THROUGH TRAIL DESIGN
Location: Davenport Room - Time: Sunday 10:45-12:00 p.m.

User conflict on natural surface trails is often avoidable. Potential conflict arises due to trail deterioration or trail design that does not properly mitigate for factors such as trail user speed, speed differential, mode of travel, sightlines, or anticipated volume of trail users. As shared use trails become the norm, land managers and trails advocates must react proactively to create highly enjoyable recreation experiences and unite different trail users. This session will provide the framework for assessing a trail system for potential user conflicts; identify situations where conflict may arise and propose methods for increasing public/volunteer participation in the mitigation process.

Moderator: Tim Wegner, Minnesota Representative, International Mountain Bicycling Association and American Trails Board Member

Speaker: Scott Linnenburger, Director of Field Programs, International Mountain Bicycling Association

THE MYTH AND MYSTERY OF TRAILS: STEPS TOWARD AN ECOLOGY OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Location: Rock Island Room - Time: Sunday 10:45-12:00 p.m.

Utilizing behavioral and ecological models, we will explore the matrix of human values and economic development principles as they apply to trails. Additionally we will take a look at some of the myths and archetypal forms that have driven some of the controversy surrounding economic development, natural resources and trail systems. By identifying key principles in the economic development process, and the effect of population migrations on development practices, we will construct a model that supports trails development as a stabilizing factor in the evolution of population dynamics that target growth markets supporting economic development activities.

Speakers: Peter Komendowski, Strategic Enlightenment, ME&V; Mark S. Edwards, Trails Coordinator, Iowa Department of Natural Resources

THE IMPORTANCE OF TRAILS
Location: Moline Room - Time: Sunday 10:45-12:00 p.m.

Trails are important to society for a multitude of different reasons. Through beautiful photographs and passionate narration, this inspirational presentation will enlighten and educate while exploring answers to the question "Why Trails?" A few of the answers to this all important question include: exercise and health benefits, protection of natural and cultural resources, alternative transportation, teaching our youth, keeping our elderly population youthful and the economic benefits. These and much more will be explored.

Speaker: Woody Keen, President, Trail Dynamics LLC and President, Professional TrailBuilders Association

Where to find it:

 

Won by Joe Walker, from Denton, Texas:

 

 

 


Updated November 21, 2006

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