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CONCURRENT SESSIONS: Sunday, Oct. 24
Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE! ~ see speaker bios

HANDMADE TRAILS & BRIDGES (Room: 5-A&B)

Well-designed handmade trails lay sustainably on the landscape and flow with the topography. Quality structures respect the landscape. Handmade trails highlight and perpetuate traditional skills and local solutions, such as drystone rockwork, logwork, and hand crafted bridges. These trails minimize resource impacts and maintenance requirements. Handmade trail skills are especially important in wildernesses and along historic trails. Drainage is the single most important factor. Project examples are drawn from Yosemite, Rocky Mountain, Big Bend, Kings Canyon, Grand Canyon, Olympic, Haleakala, and Acadia National Parks, as well as international examples from Perú, Nepal, Scotland, and Taiwan.

Speaker: Steve Griswold, Trail Planner, Golden Gate National Park, National Park Service

RAILS-WITH-TRAILS — LESSONS LEARNED: AN UPDATE (Room: 6-A)

"Rail-with-trail" (RWT) describes a trail located on or adjacent to an active railroad corridor. Under contract to the US Department of Transportation (Federal Railroad and Highway Adminis-trations), Alta Planning + Design completed a study on the best practices in RWT development and operation around the country. The report encompasses international research, outreach, technical analysis, and design. It involved hundreds of trail planners, railroad officials, and other experts. Since the report was completed in August 2002, a number of new rail-with-trail projects have opened, with lessons to share.

Speaker: Ian S. Moore, Alta Planning + Design

NO MORE HORSING AROUND (Room: 6-B)

This presentation will focus on effective trail management through successful partnerships in the Hoosier National Forest. The purpose is to give participants ideas on how to successfully bring together land managers and users when dealing with difficult issues. The program will identify past and current issues, and discuss methods of resolution. Hoosier National Forest land managers and members of the horse riding community will jointly provide their views using power point photos and discussion. The program will address fees for trail use, maintenance techniques, horsecamps adjacent to public lands, stewardship, and dealing with user conflict.

Moderator: Les Wadzinski, Recreation Program Manager, Hoosier National Forest in Indiana

Speakers: Yvette Rollins, Director, Indiana Horse Council; Gary Hersberger, Chairman, Board of Directors of the Indiana Trailriders Association; Linda Altringer, Owner, Midwest Trail Ride

PARTNERING WITH NATURE PRESERVES AND TRAILS TO PREVENT CHRONIC DISEASE (Room: 7)

This presentation will describe the Walk Texas Austin Chapter Project as an avenue to promote increasing physical activity in the community and utilization of trails and nature preserves for prevention of chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, obesity, and some cancers.

Speakers: Sabrina McCarty, Public Health Educator II, Austin/Travis County Health and Human Services Department; Louis Rene Barrera, Acting Manager, Austin Parks and Recreation Department

REGIONAL INITIATIVES SUPPORTING BICYCLE & PEDESTRIAN ACCESS TO RAIL (Room: 8-C)

The completion of nearly eighty miles of light and commuter rail in the Dallas/Fort Worth area provides new travel opportunities for residents and visitors alike, yet many barriers limit access to the regional rail system. Incompatible land uses coupled with poor sidewalk, trail and street connectivity can make accessing the stations difficult and limit ridership. This session will discuss NCTCOG initiatives to maximize the utility of the rail system, by assessing needed improvements to enhance station access for pedestrians and cyclists and the funding of transit-oriented developments.

Speaker: Jared White, Transportation Planner II, North Central Texas Council of Governments

TIME TO TURN PRO? CAPACITY-BUILDING FOR OUR ORGANIZATIONS (Room: 9-A)

The transition from all-volunteer to professionally-staffed organization is the toughest any nonprofit has to make. The Friends of the Wissahickon (which has made the transition in the last three years) and IMBA (which continues to build its own capacity and fosters the growth of its 500 affiliated clubs ) will discuss the self-assessment process, funding capacity-building, strategic planning, and picking the right staff to suit the organization's mission. Participants will learn the right questions to ask and benefit from the presenters' successes and mistakes.

Moderator: Steve Elkinton, Program Leader, National Trails System Program, National Park Service

Speakers: Tom Pelikan, Executive Director, Friends of the Wissahickon; David Pope, Vice President, Friends of the Wissahickon; Aaryn Kay, Subaru Trail Crew Coordinator, International Mountain Biking Association (IMBA)

HOW TO BUILD A SUCCESSFUL MULTI-PARTNER TRAIL SYSTEM (Room: 9-B)

This session will highlight the process and pitfalls encountered during the development of two different trails involving multiple partners. An important part of the presentation will be the focus on building critical successful partnerships, both public and private. The panel will also discuss the issues of maintenance, education, and fundraising for new and more established trails.

Moderator: Jim Rodgers, Parks Director, Williamson County

Speakers:; Mark Kimbrough, Executive Director, Tahoe Rim Trail Association; Mike Heiligenstein, Director, Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority; Sharon Prete, Director, Parks and Recreation, City of Round Rock

EMERGING ROLE OF TRAILS IN AMERICAN LIFESTYLES — JAMAICAN CASE STUDIES (Room: 10-B)

This presentation will cover the process and techniques used to develop the first water kayak trail in the Montego Bay Marine Park, which can be used as a model for developing similar water trails in other Caribbean Island conservation areas. It will also cover the process and impacts, or "Footprints," for a trail in a wetland conservation area that would have destroyed the natural functions of the wetland and threatened the stability of Negril's world famous 7 miles of beach. Finally, speakers will address how eco-tourism at Royal Palm Reserve is used positively in conservation, impacting American lifestyles and seeking to undo or prevent further impacts of human acts.

Speakers: Jerry Bauer, Acting Director International Cooperation, USDA Forest Service; Simone Williams, Executive Director, Negril Area Environmental Protection Trust

Return to the Concurrent Sessions schedule ~ see speaker bios

 

SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE!