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American Trails

CONCURRENT SESSIONS: Friday, Oct. 22
Time: 8:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.

SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE! ~ see speaker bios

ACCESSIBILITY AND TRAILS OVERVIEW — PART A
Room: 5-A&B (NOTE: This session continues at the 9:45 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. session)

This session addresses the various aspects of accessibility as it relates to trails: The legal background, the U.S. Access Board's effort, why the USDA Forest Service developed accessibility guidelines, how those guidelines function, and what's ahead for trail guidelines, including through the U.S. Access Board. Practical examples of how the accessibility guidelines are being applied to trails, while maintaining the natural setting of each hiker/pedestrian trail, will be shared through photos. Throughout the presentation discussion will be encouraged.

Speakers: Janet Zeller, National Accessibility Program Manager, USDA Forest Service; Bill Botten, Accessibility Specialist, U.S. Access Board

DOCTORS BUILDING TRAILS — FUNDING THROUGH MEDICAL COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS (Room: 6-A)

The presentation's objective is to define ways to involve medical communities in trail funding and construction projects. It will explore a unique partnership between Arkansas' largest cardiology practice and the State's first major urban trail construction venture along the Arkansas River. It will provide information regarding a unique Federal, State, county, and municipal public and private coalition. The medical community partnership brings attention to the fact that while medical communities do a good job of treating chronic illnesses like obesity, more attention should be given to providing resources which help combat and reduce the likelihood of these illnesses.

Speakers: Terry Eastin, Trails & Greenways Consultant, Headwaters Partnership Director; Robert Lambert, M.D., Heart Clinic Arkansas

TIME SAVING TECHNIQUES FOR A FAST-TRACK PROJECT (Room: 6-B)

Information will be shared on methods/techniques on how to save time during the design and construction of a fast-track greenway project. Presenters will share lessons learned by governmental entities with this $400 million flood reduction and greenway project in Grand Forks, ND and East Grand Forks, MN. Under normal conditions this project may have taken 30-years to design and construct, but a devastating flood put it on a schedule where it will be complete in less than ten-years.

Speakers: Melanie Parvey-Biby, Greenway Coordinator, City of Grand Forks, North Dakota; John Fisher, Landscape Architect for the Corps of Engineers- St. Paul District; Steve Mullally, Superintendent of Parks for the Grand Forks Park District

I COUNT! / ¡YO CUENTO! — CREATING A NEIGHBORHOOD-BASED ACTIVE COMMUNITY PROGRAM (Room: 7)

With mounting congestion and air quality concerns in the Dallas-Fort Worth region, alternatives to driving are being explored. To help address this issue, the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) has created a campaign to promote walking and cycling in the Dallas-Fort Worth area through neighborhood-based programs. The program, primarily targeting the local Hispanic population, works with community leaders, local businesses, health professionals and city council representatives to promote walking for health as well as a source of cost savings associated with reduced automobile usage. This session describes the process of developing neighborhood-based campaigns from inception to self-sufficiency.

Speaker: Jared White, Transportation Planner II, North Central Texas Council of Governments

DEVELOPING A COMMUNITY-BASED VISION FOR GREENWAYS AND TRAILS: A HISTORY OF AUSTIN METRO TRAILS & GREENWAYS (Room: 8-A&B)

This session provides an overview of the broad-based trail planning efforts led by AMTG within the greater Austin metropolitan area since 1993. The overview will discuss the development of AMTG's community-based vision in 1996, successes since then, and ongoing projects (http://www.austintrails.org). The presentation will focus on the benefits of partnerships between local governments and with non-governmental organizations in developing and implementing a regional trail plan, the benefits of incorporating a trail plan into a metropolitan planning organization's long-range transportation plan, and the value of promoting the multiple benefits of trails and greenways for recreation, transportation, fitness, and the environment.

Speakers: Jeb Boyt, President, Austin Metro Trails & Greenways; LeRoy Click, Senior Planner, Transportation and Natural Resources Department; Ted Siff, Executive Director, Austin Parks Foundation

EQUESTRIAN DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR TRAILS, TRAILHEADS, AND CAMPGROUNDS (Room: 8-C)

This workshop offers a pre-publication overview by one of the authors of the forthcoming FHWA guidelines book for equestrian trails, trailheads, and campgrounds. The book is a resource guide for architects, planners, agencies, developers, owners, and horse organizations. Participants will receive a sampling of drawings, photographs, tables, and reference materials. About 3 million of America's 6.9 million horses are used for recreation, and the number of equestrians is rapidly growing nationwide. Workshop topics include the physical and spatial needs of equines that influence trail design, desirable characteristics of equestrian trailheads, and accommodations for physically challenged riders.

Speaker: Jan Hancock, President, Hancock Resources LLC

THE ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFIT OF POROUS CONCRETE FOR PARKING, DRIVEWAYS, AND TRAILS (Room: 9-A)

The hydrologic cycle that supports life through creeks, streams, rivers, and springs is disrupted as urbanization processes cover the land with buildings and pavement. Namely, precipitation that once infiltrated the ground to replenish the groundwater or travel slowly as baseflow to creeks and streams, is diverted across roofs, gutters, and pipes to rush directly into receiving waters. A number of low impact development strategies are reversing the typical disruption of the hydrologic cycle by re-introducing precipitation to the ground. This presentation will discuss one particular strategy-- porous concrete, its uses and benefits.

Speaker: Stephen Jensen, President, Renaissance Engineering Group, Inc.

TRAIL BRIDGES — SITING, ECONOMICS, & DETAILS FOR LONGEVITY (Room: 9-B)

The audience will learn how to use a common sense approach and science to help them choose the best locations for trail bridges. Preliminary engineering, hydrology and hydraulics, alignment, environmental and geological concerns will be addressed for proper site selection. Participants will also be provided with examples of low-cost, long-lived bridges. It will identify how to develop design specifications for their individual applications and discuss how the design/build process can expedite construction. The final segment will show examples of construction details that can dramatically increase the lifespan of your trail bridges with only minor modifications.

Speakers: Jim Schneider, Assistant Director, Greene County Recreation, Parks and Cultural Arts Department, Greene County Park District; James "Scott" Groenier, P.E., Project Leader/Bridge Engineer, USDA Forest Service, Missoula Technology and Development Center & National Wood-In-Transportation Program

A CONCISE, COMPREHENSIVE SYSTEM FOR DESIGNING AND EVALUATING NATURAL SURFACE TRAILS (Room: 9-C)

Years of research resulted in a flexible, integrated, process-based system of thought for learning, teaching, and practicing trail planning, design, construction, maintenance, and management. For natural surface and crushed stone trails, it works for ALL trail uses and locations, identifies basic forces and relationships (both physical and human), generates sustainability and enjoyability at the same time, forms a concise design language, tightly weaves trails into sites, predicts change over time, improves trailbuilding techniques, engenders natural resource stewardship, and provides quick and effective trail evaluation. You'll never look at trails the same way again. Learn more at www.natureshape.com.

Speaker: Troy Scott Parker, Natureshape LLC

GIVING TRAIL PROJECTS LIFE AND SUSTAINING THEM WITH INNOVATIVE AND EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGY (Room: 10-A)

Projects can suffer from waning involvement and inconsistent funding because users and supporters can't or don't know how to contribute effectively. Research and planning methods MUST engage the public and let them watch their ideas come to life. The use of Palm® and web-based and digital video recording surveying and outreach can provide efficient, affordable and regular means to reach users and build a constituency and funding base for a project throughout its lifespan. Learn how to identify needs, communicate plans, find working partners, solve problems and, take an entrepreneurial approach to getting long-term, relevant, project ownership and stewardship.

Speakers; Emilie C. Ailts, Owner, Marketing Support; Michael J. Weisman, Vice President, InQuery; Brent Luck, Landscape Architect

PRINCIPLES AND PROGRAMS TO PROMOTE RESPONSIBLE OHV RECREATION ACTIVITY (ROOM: 10-B)

A review of successful programs and efforts by national motorized organizations to enhance and promote effective management and responsible recreation behavior. The review includes off-highway vehicle recreation management workshops, mobile public education programs, statewide outreach efforts, field sound testing programs, and formal collaboration by diverse motorized and non-motorized interests to develop and promote state legislation to reduce sound limits.

Moderator: Dana Bell, Project Coordinator, National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council

Speakers: Russ Ehnes, Executive Director, National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council; Bill Dart, Executive Director, Blue Ribbon Coalition; Royce Wood, Legislative Affairs Specialist, American Motorcyclist Association

Return to the Concurrent Sessions schedule ~ see speaker bios

SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE!