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CONCURRENT SESSIONS: Friday, Oct. 22
Time: 3:45 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE! ~ see speaker bios

AUSTIN POWERS: TRAILS FOR THE "CITY OF IDEAS" (Room: 5-A&B)

This session will provide an opportunity to take trails to a new level in urban planning and development. Session participants will have the opportunity to explore the role trails serve in sustainable regional development. Presentations will feature global examples including Bogota, the Netherlands, Las Vegas and Denver. Our host city of Austin is known as the "City of Ideas," and recently announced its "intention to become the clean energy capital of the world." How can this kind of momentum be used to move the "Trails for All Americans" vision to the top of your region's priority list?

Speakers: Jeff Olson, Consultant; Bob Searns, Founding Associate, The Greenway Team, Inc; Chuck Flink, Founder and Owner of Greenways Incorporated; Charles Gandy, Livable Communities Consulting

LATIN AMERICA'S SENDEROS AND TRILHAS: EXPANDING TRAIL NETWORKS FROM CHIHUAHUA TO CHILE (Room: 6-A)

We describe trails initiatives in the Andean region and Central America and highlight international partnerships to bolster capacity to build, maintain, and interpret trails in Latin America. We contrast trails movements in the U.S. and Canada and among the diverse nations of Latin America. Trails contribute to economic development, environmental education, healthy lifestyles and strengthening conservation constituencies in both regions, but provision of community economic benefits is particularly important in poverty-stricken Latin America. Significant differences include the lack of a prominent "trails culture," and more limited funding and trained human resources for trails in Latin America.

Speakers: Larry Lechner, Colorado State University; Jim Barborak, The Wildlife Conservation Society

ROADS TO TRAILS: A GROWING PHENOMENONÉ TURNING GREY INFRASTRUCTURE INTO GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE (Room: 6-B)

An increasing number of roads and bridges in the United States are being converted, on either a part or full-time basis, to multi-use trails. Some of the part-time trails are well known, such as the loop road in New York's Central Park and Rock Creek Parkway in Washington, D.C. Roads that are considered obsolete and have been converted into full-time trails include the Columbia River Gorge Trail near Portland, Oregon and Route 66 in Nevada. This session will explore the lessons learned from communities that have gone through the unique process of turning a road into a trail, including design retrofit issues, costs, management issues, and gauging community sentiment.

Speakers: Hugh Morris, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy; Jeffrey Ciabotti, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

KINGSBOROUGH DESIGN CHARETTE (Room: 7)

Design professionals, planners, and trails enthusiasts held a design charette focused on the Kingsborough Master Planned Community in Kaufman County, Texas. During the charette, the team explored state of the art concepts for creating new communities that sustain a trail-oriented lifestyle. The results of this charette will be presented in this session with an emphasis upon the developers' perspective to community-wide value added by the incorporation of trails into the master plan, specific interfaces of trails with each of the master plan components, and the importance of connecting new communities with existing and planned trail networks.

Moderator: Mark Bowers, ASLA, AICP, Texas Director of Urban Design and Planning, HNTB Corporation

Speakers: James L. Mabrey, Mabrey & Partners, LLC; Mark Meyer, ASLA, TBG Partners; W. J. "Bud" Melton III, APBP, Vice President, Bowman-Melton Associates, Inc.

TRAILS FUNDING FROM TAX DOLLARS (Room: 8-A&B)

The federal budget pie is divided into several slices. Get a taste of how much, how to find and how to access federal trails funding in three vital budget areas-- Transportation, Interior and Health and Human Services. Discuss the status of trails on our federal public lands, the opportunities and challenges faced by recreationists there, and how federal policies and targeted funding can help improve recreation opportunities. This presentation will also cover the connection to current public health program and funding opportunities. Attendees will leave with an understanding of how to navigate Federal, State, and local public health funding mechanisms.

Moderator: Chris Campbell, Senior Associate, Washington Federal Practice, PricewaterhouseCoopers

Speakers: Marianne Fowler, Vice President of Programs, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy; Mary Margaret Sloan, President, American Hiking Society; Tammy Vehige, Physical Activity Interventionist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CONSISTENCY ACROSS BOUNDARIES: INTERAGENCY TRAIL DATA STANDARDS (Room: 8-C)

Consistent trail information across boundaries is critical for accurate maps, inventories, condition assessments, maintenance, budgeting and costing, and system summaries. Yet there's never been a Federal interagency data structure. Together over the past three years, a team of NPS, BLM, and Forest Service staff developed the Interagency Trail Data Standards that are applicable nationwide. They have been widely reviewed and will enable national, regional, State and local managers (and the public) to use common term definitions and data attributes for consistent trail information. Join us to explore how the new standards will make sharing basic trail data easy and efficient.

Speakers: Jaime Schmidt, National Trails Information Coordinator, USDA Forest Service; Helen Scully, Program Assistant, National Trails System Program, National Park Service; Bill Gibson, Arizona State Office Trails and Travel Management Lead, Bureau of Land Management

TEACHING WITH TRAILS: LINEAR CLASSROOMS AND OUTDOOR LABORATORIES (Room: 9-A)

Trails offer exceptional opportunities for education about our landscapes. The Planet Walk along the Baltimore & Annapolis Trail Park and Austin's Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center will be used as examples to illustrate the use of trails as mechanism for education. The Maryland examples will relate how trails have been used to inspire and motivate children to study math, science, health, history and the arts while engaging the students on a personal level. The Texas example will describe the design and effectiveness of a trail system embedded within a research demonstration and relates considerations that should be taken to ensure minimal landscape damage.

Speakers: Dr. Mark Simmons, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center; David G. Dionne, Superintendent, Trails and Greenways, Anne Arundel County, Maryland

ART OF PARTNERING: QUAD CITIES (Room: 9-B)

When trails are separated by the Mississippi River, states, counties, cities and cross security-conscious federal military installations, how do you build -- and more importantly maintain -- connections? The hosts of the 2006 National Trails Symposium, the Quad Cities of Davenport/Bettendorf, Iowa and Rock Island/Moline, Illinois will share their success stories. The trails in the Quad Cities read like a "Who's Who" of major trails... the American Discovery Trail, the Mississippi River Trail, the Great River Trail, the Grand Illinois Trails, the Hennepin Canal Trail, and more. More than 65 miles of seamless riverside trails include parks, kiosks, and public art. Quad Cities pros will share how they did it.

Plan to see all this firsthand at the 18th National Trails Symposium in Quad Cities in 2006.

Speakers: Joe Taylor, Director, Quad Cities Convention Visitors Bureau

ROUTE EVALUATION: DESIGNATION, LOCATION, PLANNING, ACQUISITION, AND GIS TOOLS (Room: 9-C)

This presentation will convey systematic methods to locate and designate optimal trail routes by considering land-acquisition/easement alternatives, public access needs, concerns and statutory requirements through the coordinated use of software and Geographic Information System (GIS) database tools.

Moderator: Bill Hay, Owner of TEAMS, an internal Forest Service business enterprise

Speakers: Les Weeks, President, Advanced Resource Solutions; Donald T. King, Realty Officer, National Trails Lands Office; Liz LaPorta, GIS Ecologist, USDA Forest Service T.E.A.M.S Enterprise

IMPROVING THE ECOLOGICAL FUNCTIONING OF GREENWAYS AND OPEN SPACE TRAILS (Room: 10-A)

Is the greenway movement destroying the environment? We will discuss a new role for trails in protecting greenway corridors to help restore the ecological function of river systems. Greenways can not only improve the health of people, but if developed properly, can also enhance the health of the environment. Using a case study from Orange County, California, we will learn how to use geographic information systems (GIS) to identify trail segments that may impact soils susceptible to erosion, areas of noxious weed spread, and wildlife disturbance resulting from recreational use of the park trail system.

Speakers: Mike Reeder, Resource Management Specialist, Orange County Harbors, Beaches, and Parks Division; John F. McFadden, Doctoral Student, Middle Tennessee State University; Dr. Mark Ivy, Assistant Professor, Middle Tennessee State University, Recreation & Leisure Services

DRY TRAILS IN WET LANDS: TWO SUCCESSFUL PARTNERSHIP STORIES (Room: 10-B)

Learn how to be a recreational partner from two public agencies-- even a levee is a recreation opportunity in disguise. See how flood control and environmental restoration projects provide accessible trails that link public areas and provide a natural appeal of their own. The South Florida Water Management District will describe policy successes and planning strategies for recreation on the Everglades Restoration. The Harris County Flood Control District of Texas will share its partnership experience with the National Park Service. Presenters will describe what elements to look for in a public process to ensure success with a public agency.

Moderator: Alvin B. Jackson Jr., Deputy Executive Director of Government and Public Affairs, South Florida Water Management District

Speakers: Jerry Krenz, Manager of The Recreation and Equity Programs for Everglades Restoration, South Florida Water Management District; Rachel Decker, Community Services Coordinator for Harris County Flood Control District; Kathryn Nichols, Community Planner with the National Park Service's Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance Program.

Return to the Concurrent Sessions schedule ~ see speaker bios

SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE!