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19th National Trails Symposium in Little Rock, Arkansas, November 15-18, 2008

CONCURRENT SESSIONs & MINI WORKSHOPS

Read bios of the many Symposium speakers and presenters...

We invite your to choose from 51 educational sessions and 10 mini-workshops In keeping with our theme, “Innovative Trails: Transforming the American Way of Life,” These sessions will help participants understand how trails are “transforming our nation and the way we live” and are becoming a prominent factor in how and where we choose to live: creating transportation, recreational and educational opportunities; encouraging well being; exploring history and heritage; bringing together people of all ages and abilities; and connecting communities.

photo of classroom
Concurrent sessions will help us to enhance and protect our systems of trails

SESSIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

All concurrent sessions are 75 minutes in length. The Mini-Workshops are 105 minutes long with each of the 10 workshops repeated twice. Consult the Statehouse Convention Center and Peabody Hotel maps on the back of this Program for room locations.

 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 15
Time: 7:45 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

TRAILS ACROSS THE DIVIDE
Download PowerPoint presentation
on Underground Railroad Bicycle Route (pdf 2.1 mb)
Download PowerPoint presentation
on Great Divide Mountain Bike Route (pdf 2.1 mb)

Pope Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

Using compelling themes and unique partnerships, Adventure Cycling Association broadened our appeal resulting in unequaled media recognition and a growing membership base. This session focuses on two the innovative Great Divide Mountain Bike Route and Underground Railroad Bicycle Route. The Great Divide is an innovative trail, in that we fashioned a Canada-to-Mexico cycling route out of what was already there: simply linking together and mapping existing public travel-ways. The Underground Railroad Bicycle Route explores one of the many fabled paths to freedom; from the Deep South to Canada. We worked in partnership with the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Minority Health to highlight this cultural struggle while celebrating diversity and promoting health and recreation. The ideas are replicable for any organization, no matter the size.

Moderator & Speaker: Ginny Sullivan, New Routes Coordinator, Adventure Cycling Association

DEVELOPING AND OPERATING WATER TRAILS AT THE LOCAL, STATEWIDE AND REGIONAL LEVELS
Download PowerPoint presentation
on Lake Superior Water Trail (ppt 2.4 mb)
Download PowerPoint presentation
on Minnesota’s Water Trail Program (pdf 4.1 mb)
Download PowerPoint presentation
onSusquehanna River Trail (pdf 9.3 mb)

Fulton Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

Come learn how water trails are connecting people to waterways as practitioners describe their successful programs of developing and managing extensive water trails. This session will focus on three distinct programs, the Susquehanna River and brief mention of the Pennsylvania Water Trail Program, the Lake Superior Water Trail - an international and multi-state effort, and Minnesota's management of over 4,000 miles of Water Trails. Funding and completing water trails requires a strong vision, development of citizen and agency support, partnerships, unending persistence, and creativity. Learn how these components have resulted in water trails that have had positive ecological, economic and cultural benefits for the community, state, and region.

Moderator: Peter Hark, Operations Manager, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

Speakers: Peter Hark, Operations Manager, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; James McNulty, Susquehanna River Water Trail Association; Angie Tornes, Natural & Recreation Resource Planner, National Park Service Rivers and Trails Program

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16
Time: 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

GRADE-SEPARATED TRAIL CROSSINGS: HOW DO WE GET OVER THERE?
Download PowerPoint presentation
: (pdf 8 mb)

Chicot Room (Peabody Hotel)

Session Description: Trail crossings can represent a major trail development challenge, and the attention given to the planning and design of these critical areas can dramatically impact project cost, safety and the trail user experience. Key presentation elements will include a list of factors that trail planners and designers should consider, such as trail-user types and their associated needs, the type of barrier being crossed (roadways, railroads, waterways), whether an at-grade or grade-separated crossing offers the best solution, and design challenges to expect with these often costly projects. The presentation will provide invaluable information for planning and budgeting your next trail crossing.

Moderator: Hugh Osborne, Outdoor Recreation Planner, National Park Service Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance, Intermountain Region

Speakers: Rory Renfro is a Senior Planner at Alta Planning + Design; Scott Belonger, P.E., Project Manager, Loris and Associates; Peter Loris, P.E. is president of Loris and Associates

THE IMMENSE BENEFITS OF TRAILS: MORE THAN JUST EXERCISE
Fulton Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

Land managers often find it hard to articulate the value of trails beyond the standard “gets people to exercise outdoors.” This session covers ways to promote specific and measurable benefits. Economic benefits include jobs in tourism like rafting tours, rentals, restaurants, and lodging; in industry; and trail construction. Ecological benefits include helping communities mitigate costs associated with pollution control and flood management. Social benefits include a higher rate of students going on to college after high school, pride in the community decreased drug usage rates, and a higher quality of life.

Moderator: Bert Turner, Central Arkansas Master Naturalists

Speakers: Dave Lemberg, Associate Professor, Geology Dept. Western Michigan University; Mike Pinkerton Director of Marketing, Hatfield-McCoy Trails

TURNING HOMES INTO TRAILHEADS: MAKING THE CONNECTION BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE TRAILS
Download PowerPoint presentation:
Town to Trail: The Park City, Utah Story (pdf 420 kb)
Download PowerPoint presentation:
Teton Valley Trails and Pathways promotes a trails-connected community (pdf 1.1 mb)

White Oak Room (Peabody Hotel)

From the New York Times to the Wall Street Journal, popular media increasingly tell the story of homeowners’ desires to have trails accessible from their doorstep. To meet this growing desire, it is critical for trail planners to work closely with private developers. In fact, the very success of many community trail networks is reliant upon the integration of public trails with private development pathways. This presentation will offer two perspectives on how trail advocates, local governments and developers are working together to achieve success. Join this session to learn how to build a public/private trail network that turns homes into trailheads.

Moderator: Jim Wood, Assistant Director, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Office of Greenways & Trails

Speakers: Tim Adams, Executive Director, Teton Valley Trails And Pathways; Carol Potter, Executive Director, Mountain Trails Foundation

A TRAIL TO EVERY CLASSROOM
Download PowerPoint presentation (pdf 6.0 mb)
Miller Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

This session will look at professional development as a means of reaching out to communities and engaging youth in trail activities. A Trail to Every Classroom (TTEC) was developed by the National Park Service and the Appalachian Trail Conservancy as an innovative three-season program for K-12 teachers that promotes a conservation ethic, civic participation, and healthy lifestyles by using the Appalachian Trail as an educational and active recreational resource. Learn how this model was developed and can be adapted for your trail. Better yet, hear first hand from a TTEC alumni how the program led to the development of multi-disciplinary curruriculum and its affect on kids.

Moderator: Rick Potts, Chief, Conservation and Outdoor Recreation, National Park Service

Speakers: Rita Hennessy, Outdoor Recreation Specialist, Appalachian National Scenic Trail, National Park Service; Janis Brannon is the Science Coordinator for Summit Charter School in Cashiers, North Carolina

INVITING THE COMMUNITY BACK INTO THE WOODS- NATURAL TRAILS IN URBAN LANDSCAPES
Download PowerPoint presentation:
Emerging Trends in Pocket Bike Parks (pdf 2.6 mb)
Download PowerPoint presentation:
Inviting the Community Back Into the Wood (pdf 760 kb)
Izard Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

Urbanization has taken a toll on natural landscapes. Subsequently, urbanites have lost their connection to these lands. The natural lands left in urban areas have often been heavily impacted in social and ecological manners, leaving them a blight rather than an amenity for the community. This session endeavors to describe multiple projects that are currently bucking this trend- restoring natural systems, providing high quality recreation, and inviting communities back into the woods. In providing recreation solutions in small, natural spaces and large urban parks, the trails community is uniting to challenge to the concrete jungle.

Moderator: Ryan Schutz, Affiliate Programs Manager, International Mountain Bicycling Association

Speakers: Dr. Maura McCarthy, Executive Director, Friends Of Wissahickon; Ben Blitch, Owner, B4 Consulting and Construction; Kelly and Collins Bishop, Subaru/IMBA Trail Care Crew

INFORMAL (VISITOR-CREATED) TRAIL IMPACTS: MANAGEMENT CONCERNS, MONITORING METHODS, VISITOR EDUCATION, AND SITE MANAGEMENT
Grampas Room (Peabody Hotel)

Formal trail systems never provide access to all locations required by visitors to protected natural areas. Thus, some informal (visitor-created) trails are necessary, though managers frequently consider extensive networks or severely degraded trails to be unacceptable. This session reviews the resource impacts associated with informal trails, and presents a decision process to guide their management. Methods for monitoring the number, lineal extent, and condition of informal trails are included to inform managers and to gauge the success of corrective actions. Management options are also described, ranging from visitor education to site management.

Moderator: Jeff Marion, Recreation Ecologist, U.S. Geological Survey & Adjunct Professor, Virginia Tech

Speakers: Jeff Marion, Recreation Ecologist, U.S. Geological Survey & Adjunct Professor, Virginia Tech; Karen Umphress, Project Coordinator, National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council and American Trails Board Member; Clay Malcolm, Trails Supervisor, City of Boulder, Open Space and Mountain Parks

THE POWER OF PARTNERSHIPS - ARKANSAS SUCCESS STORIES
Download PowerPoint presentation (pdf 1.9 mb)
Caraway II & III (Statehouse Convention Center)

Two success stories from the Ouachita Mountain region of Arkansas illustrate the many ways partnering and coalitions can serve the trail community. The Lake Ouachita Vista Trail (LOViT) was the dream of local citizens, made real by the cooperation of two federal agencies, a county judge, and volunteer labor. Friends of the Ouachita Trail (FoOT) is an all-volunteer group, organized exclusively to provide assistance for the maintenance, enhancement and use of the 223-mile backcountry Ouachita National Recreation Trail. These two stories provide valuable lessons in multiple user groups working together, multiple agencies cooperating, and users and agencies teaming for success.

Moderator: Tim Oosterhouse, Recreation Manager, Ouachita National Forest, USFS

Speakers: Jerry Shields, Lake Ouachita Citizens Focus Committee and Traildog Volunteers; Jim Gifford, President, Friends of the Ouachita Trail; Steve Weston, Recreational Trails Program, AR Highway & Transportation Department; Kirstin Bartlow, AR Game & Fish Commission; Brenda Meeks, US Army Corps of Engineers.

THE LAW AND OPINIONS: RECREATION LIMITED LIABILITY LAW AND PRIVATE LANDOWNERS
Conway Room (Peabody Hotel)

All but a few states have a limited liability law that affords private landowners protection if the landowner allows public recreation on their property. Still, some lawyers and insurance agents advise their clients against allowing access for recreation. What are the issues? What has worked to convince landowners to allow access for recreation? Are there recommendations we as trail users and voting citizens could make to state elected officials to improve this law? The speakers will discuss their experiences, opinions, and recommendations for improving this vital trail related law.

Moderator: Mary Hanson, Outdoor Recreation Planner, Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance, National Park Service

Speakers: Jan Dawson, J.D. American Association for Horsemanship Safety; Fran Wallas, J.D., Tennessee State Parks

CONNECTING PEOPLE AND HERITAGE THROUGH TRAILS AND GREENWAYS; THE NW ARKANSAS HERITAGE TRAIL AND THE CONFLUENCE GREENWAY
Pope Room (State Convention Center)

The Northwest Arkansas Regional Planning Commission established the Heritage Trail as a component of the 2030 NWA Regional Transportation Plan as "A regional network of bicycle and pedestrian facilities that connects citizens and visitors to our rich heritage, our recreational and cultural assets, a healthy lifestyle, and to each other". The Confluence Project is a community-based initiative orchestrated through a bi-state collaboration of 5 non-profit organizations called the Confluence Partnership to focus and facilitate local, state and federal agencies and civic leadership developing a conservation, heritage and recreational corridor along the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers in the St. Louis metropolitan area. This presentation will explore the challenges and successes brought about by the unique partnering of a private non-profit with government agencies and community groups in regional trail projects.

Moderator: Bryan Kellar, Outdoor Recreation Grants Program, Arkansas
State Parks

Speakers: John Hoal, PhD, AICP, Founding Principal of H3 Studio Inc;
John McLarty, Assistant Director, Northwest Arkansas Regional Planning
Commission

MAKING HORSE TRAILS SUSTAINABLE, FUN AND COMPATIBLE
Harris Brake Room (Peabody Hotel)

“HORSES DESTROY TRAILS!” You’ve heard it said, but is it true? If a trail is incorrectly designed, constructed or maintained just about any use will destroy a trail. In this session you will learn how to make a horse, or any, trail sustainable.

Moderator: Mylon Filkins, DVM Equine practitioner Bakersfield California. American Trails Board Equestrian representative, Chairman American Horse Council Recreation committee. Past Chair Back Country Horsemen of America.

Speakers: John Favro, American Trails Board, trail consultant Dennis Dailey, Advisor; wilderness management and planning, Back Country Horsemen of America

 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16
Time: 10:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

TRAILS AND INVASIVES – REALITIES AND MANAGEMENT
Grampas Room (Peabody Hotel)

This session will provide an overview of (1) the potential environmental concerns associated with the recreational use of trails and the introduction of invasive species and (2) proven management strategies to mitigate the introduction and establishment of invasive species. Specific questions that will be discussed include: “Are horses responsible for the introduction of noxious/invasive plants on trails?” and “The spread of noxious weeds by people on foot and horseback: villains or victims?”

Moderator: Bonnie Davis, Equestrian Consultant

Speakers: Bonnie Davis, Equestrian Consultant, California National Park Service/Dominican University; Dr. Stith T. Gower, Department of Forest Ecology & Management, University of Wisconsin, Tony Pernas, National Park Service, Biological Resources Management Division Florida/Caribbean Exotic Plant Management Team, Palmetto, Florida.

TOOLS AND TECHNOLOGY FOR ACCESSIBLE TRAILS
White Oak Room (Peabody Hotel)

This presentation will provide managers and users with helpful information on trail accessibility issues. We will review how to inventory and provide objective trail data for any trail system. We will also discuss products that can improve trail accessibility and reduce maintenance that is consistent with accessibility legislation.

Moderator: Peter Axelson, Director of Research and Development, Beneficial Designs, Inc

Speakers: Peter Axelson, Director of Research and Development, Beneficial Designs, Inc, Jeremy Vlcan, Trails Project Assistant Coordinator, Beneficial Designs, Inc

OVER UNDER THROUGH INFRASTRUCTURE OBSTACLESS
Download PowerPoint presentation
on Road and Trail Intersection Safety (pdf 3.7 mb)
Miller Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

Every trail project faces daunting physical obstacles to accessible, safe, and desperately-needed pedestrian and bicycle mobility: road intersections; a missing bridge; active railroad; or a piece of the federal highway system. Learn how a New York study of road and trail intersections generated policy and design recommendations and a public education campaign for trail users and motorists. And also how several small Pennsylvania communities have overcome physical, bureaucratic, and legal issues and "pushed the envelope" in policy, aesthetics, funding, engineering and structural materials to address major infrastructure obstacles and solve them with unique determination, creativity and style.

Moderator: Rhonda Border-Boose, Director, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy Midwest Office

Speakers: Fran Gotcsik, Director of Programs and Policy for Parks & Trails New York; William J. Collins, RLA, ASLA, Vice President of Simone Collins Landscape Architecture

STATE OF THE ART TECHNOLOGY FOR MODERN TRAILS
Download PowerPoint presentation
on Monitoring with Panoramas and Fixed Photopoints (pdf 2.9 mb)
Chicot Room (Peabody Hotel)

Today’s techno-savvy trail users expect to be able to plan and preview their trail experience with accurate GPS and GIS data viewed in programs like Google Earth. Trail managers also expect to use modern technology like time-lapsed video from a basic digital camera to detect changes in trails or trail use over time. This session will address some of those technologies, and it will also describe how the US Forest Service’s Technology Transfer program keeps track of these emerging uses of technology and lets users and land managers know how to find and use such technologies.

Moderator: Bert Turner, Central Arkansas Master Naturalists

Speakers: James "Scott" Groenier, Project Leader, U. S. Forest Service, Missoula Technology and Development Center; Chip Young, Trail Specialist, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

USING THE RAPID ASSESSMENT VISITOR INVENTORY (RAVI) TO MONITOR CHANGES IN TRAIL USE
Conway Room (Peabody Hotel)

Changes occur in amounts of trail use and in trail conditions over time. Samples of numbers of trail users and their perceptions of trail conditions help managers make decisions about trails and trail use. A place-specific, inexpensive Raid Assessment Visitor Inventory (RAVI) has been developed to conduct visitor counts and surveys in a short (2 week) time frame. The RAVI system has been tested at various management areas in four states. Two case study examples will be presented describing how the RAVI was administered: on a popular horse riding area on the Hoosier national Forest in Indiana in 2005, and 2007; and on by the US Army Corps of Engineers, manager of Table Rock Lake near Branson on a 2.2 mile lakeshore trail at Table Rock State Park.

Moderator: John Collins, Associate Professor, University of North Texas, American Trails Board

Speakers: Kenneth Chilman, Associate Professor Emeritus, Forestry Department, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Illinois; Greg Oller, Lake Manager, US Army Corps of Engineers, Table Rock Lake; Les Wadzinski, Recreation Program Manager, U.S. Forest Service, Hoosier National Forest

TRAILS AND TOURISM: PARTNERING FOR PROMOTION
Izard Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

Trails are transforming the way of life for many tourists. Visitors increasingly seek active vacations and new experiences that immerse them in the places they visit. Incredible potential exists to build upon the rapidly growing demand for opportunities to explore new places from a trail. Drawing on experiences from places as different as Florida in the Sun Belt and the Quad Cities in the Corn Belt, this session will demonstrate how state and local tourism and visitor organizations are partnering with trail planners, advocates and managers to promote trails as visitor destinations.

Moderator: Jim Wood, Assistant Director, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Office of Greenways & Trails

Speakers: Jim Wood, Assistant Director, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Office of Greenways & Trails; Joe Taylor, President/CEO, Quad Cities Convention and Visitors Bureau

THE U.S. BICYCLE ROUTE SYSTEM – BE A PART OF THE LARGEST CYCLING NETWORK IN THE WORLD - Download PowerPoint presentation (pdf 2.7 mb)
Pope Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

The timing for a national bicycle route network is opportune. As American’s concept of quality of life is changing, our neighborhoods and transportation systems are adapting. Trails and bicycle routes are springing up across the country. The U.S. Bicycle Route System (USBRS) will help offset environmental and health concerns by providing another travel option– whether commuting across town or a cross country adventure. Learn how the corridor-level plan was developed in partnership with the non-profit AASHTO and join Adventure Cycling and others in promoting state adoption of an interstate route system for bikes. A united approach will ensure the best routes and trails are woven into a system.

Moderator: Ginny Sullivan, New Routes Coordinator, Adventure Cycling Association

Speakers: Ginny Sullivan, New Routes Coordinator, Adventure Cycling Association; Christopher Douwes, National Trails Enhancements Coordinator, FHWA, Karen Votava, Executive Director, East Cost Greenway Coalition

ALL SUCCESSFUL TRAILS NEED PARTNERSHIPS AND COALITIONS
Download PowerPoint presentation (pdf 1.2 mb)
Caraway II & III (Statehouse Convention Center)

Successful trails are the product of partnerships among a wide array of entities, including governmental land managing agencies, private property owners, user groups, local businesses, planners, chambers of commerce, and others. This interactive presentation will discuss the importance of creating a strong coalition of diverse stakeholders and identify strategies to effectively engage them when developing a water trail and share revelations (secrets?!) of how several partnerships between the U.S. Forest Service and non-profit organizations were created….even without any Agency budget ! The takeaway for participants are succinct lessons learned that will dramatically increase their success in starting up and maintaining partnerships with other organizations

Moderator: Bryan Kellar, Outdoor Recreation Grants Program, Arkansas State Parks

Speakers, Matt Rice, American Rivers, Associate Director of Southeast Conservation; Mary Crockett, Program Coordinator –River Manager for South Carolina Department of Natural Resources; Steve Hale, Recreation Specialist, USDA-Forest Service, Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest

BIKING TOWARD A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
Harris Brake Room (Peabody Hotel)

Unable to stomach a future where fewer people have access to a healthy lifestyle, the International Mountain Bicycling Association and Trek Bicycle Corporation have created progressive initiatives to bring more trails closer to more people. IMBA’s Ride Center program is creating regional, destination quality trail systems that provide model opportunities for the first time mountain biker to the seasoned professional rider. Trek’s One World, Two Wheels program is donating a portion of bike and helmet sales to building trails and developing bike-friendly communities. Together, these initiatives endeavor to position cycling as an everyday activity for millions more Americans by providing improved access to trails, bike-specific infrastructure, and ultimately a healthier and more sustainable future.

Moderator: Mike Van Abel, Executive Director, International Mountain Bicycling Association

Speakers: Rebecca Anderson, Advocacy Director, Trek Bicycle Corporation; Scott Gordon, Ride Center Coordinator, International Mountain Bicycling Association

PUTTING THE PUBLIC INTO PUBLIC SAFETY
Download PowerPoint presentation
on 911 Trail Address Location Solutions (pdf 1.3 mb)
Fulton Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

This panel discussion will address strategies and tactics for promoting safety on urban trails through public education, volunteerism, and cooperation with local law enforcement agencies. In addition we will explore ways to make trail users safer and managers better informed through use of the latest technologies in trail marking.

Moderator: John Beneke, Arkansas State Parks

Speakers: Eric Van Steenburg, Executive Director for the Friends of the Katy Trail; Bud Melton, Vice President, Bowman Melton; Rick Anderssen, Chief of Police Reserves, Dallas Police Department; John Hohol, National Market Manager, Rhino Marking & Protection Systems

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17
Time: 11:15 a.m. – 12:30 a.m.

THE VALUE TRAIL: NATURE’S CONTRIBUTION TO A DEVELOPER’S BOTTOM LINE
Miller Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

Learn how to promote trails to developers in a language they understand - value. Trails enhance sales rates, sales prices, and create positive community relations. Leisure and building industry experts have studies and research that prove that trails don't just serve a limited target market, they serve a mass market that has money to spend.  Randy has financial projections that will demonstrate how a trail can positively impact the bottom line of a planned development. In a time when builders are looking for ways to add value to their homes, a simple but well designed trail system may be the feature to set a community apart.

Moderator: Jim Wood, Assistant Director, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Office of Greenways & Trails

Speaker: Randy Martin, President, Trailscape, Inc.

FEDERAL TRANSPORTATION FUNDS BENEFIT TRAILS
Download PowerPoint presentation:
Federal Highway Administration programs benefit trails (pdf 248 kb)
See web page version

Download PowerPoint presentation:
Transportation Enhancements in Oregon: funding trails and bike/ped facilities (pdf 4.0 mb)
Conway Room (Peabody Hotel)

This presentation will discuss transportation funding programs that benefit trails and trail-related activities, focusing on Transportation Enhancement Activities and the Recreational Trails Program. It will provide State-specific examples. The Federal Highway Administration’s Transportation Enhancement (TE) Activities and Recreational Trails Program (RTP) provide funds to develop transportation and recreation infrastructure. TE activities benefit the traveling public and help communities to increase transportation choices and access for pedestrians and bicyclists; and enhance the built and natural environment through scenic and historic highway programs, landscaping, historic preservation, and environmental mitigation. The RTP provides funds to the States to develop and maintain recreational trails and trail-related facilities. This presentation will explain these programs and offer suggestions on how to apply for funds.

Moderator: Christopher Douwes, Trails and Enhancement Program Manager, Federal Highway Administration

Speakers: Christopher Douwes, Trails and Enhancement Program Manager, Federal Highway Administration, Patricia Fisher, Transportation Enhancement Program Manager, Oregon Department of Transportation, Rocky Houston, State Trails Coordinator, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department

NO MORE HORSING AROUND – WHO ARE EQUESTRIANS, WHAT DO THEY WANT, AND HOW CAN LAND MANAGERS AND EQUESTRIANS WORK TOGETHER?
Download PowerPoint presentation (pdf 1.1 mb)
Caraway II Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

This panel will pair land managers with horse riders for a discussion of how each can help the other in meeting their goals. First, the Missouri Department of Conservation will relate how they got to know their horse users using surveys and other methods, and how that data was used in decision making. The Hoosier National Forest will follow with a case history of how they and local horse clubs turned an adversarial situation to one of partnering. Finally, riders from several Indiana horse clubs will give their perspective on how they work with the Hoosier National Forest on topics ranging from fees to the role of adjacent camps to training and certification.

Moderator: Jacque Alexander, Equestrian Representative

Speakers: Les Wadzinski, Recreation Program Manager, Hoosier National
Forest; Yvette Rollins, President of the Hoosier Bank Country Horsemen, Inc.; Greg Hersberger, Indiana Trail Riders Association; Tom Treiman, Natural Resource Economist, Missouri Department of Conservation

IMPROVING THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT: HOW URBAN TRAIL SYSTEMS AND COMPLETE STREETS PROVIDE CONNECTIONS WITHIN CITIES
Complete Streets provide all elements of multi-modal transportation
(web page)
Download PowerPoint presentation
on Urban Trails and Complete Streets (pdf 2.5 mb)

Izard Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

Take a densely built environment, the need for alternative transportation, desires for recreational opportunities, and goals of economic growth and you have the challenge faced today by many cities when looking at introducing trail connections. This session will focus on the big and innovative thinking necessary to retrofit an urban environment for a multi-use trail system and how complete streets policies help communities create road networks that are safe and inviting for everyone.

Moderator: Ken Eastin, Eastin Outdoors, Inc.

Speakers: Greta deMayo, Senior Associate, Ecos Environmental Design, Inc; Phillip Pugliese, Bicycle Coordinator, Outdoor Chattanooga

OFF-HIGHWAY VEHICLE PARTNERSHIPS FOR RESPONSIBLE RECREATION
Download PowerPoint presentation
on Arizona's OHV Ambassador Program (pdf 2.5 mb)
Caraway III Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

The Bureau of Land Management and Tread Lightly are partnering to get kids "On the Right Trail" through a new education curriculum in Utah, where children are learning responsible OHV use. Learn how this successful program can be applied in your State. Attendees will also hear about an innovative program in Arizona to establish OHV Ambassadors who are transforming the way OHV use is managed in their budget-challenged state. Take away tools include how to train volunteers, bring a recognizable present to public lands, maintain motorized trails, and educate the public.

Moderator: Alison B. Bullock, Tennessee Projects Director, Rivers, Trails & Conservation Assistance, National Park Service

Speakers: Robin Fehlau, Outdoor Recreation Planner, Bureau of Land Management; Mary Van Buren, Education Specialist, Tread Lightly!; Bill Gibson, Travel Management Coordinator, Bureau of Land Management's Arizona State Office

TRAILS FOR THE FUTURE: TRENDS, ISSUES, AND OPPORTUNITIES
Harris Brake Room (Peabody Hotel)

Our goal with this session is to propose a vision for the future of trails and greenways and to encourage sharing of the problems and solutions seen by participants. Attendees will have an opportunity to step outside the routines of existing trails and to brainstorm with other trail advocates on the challenges and new ideas of the future. We'll be identifying innovations that we can pursue in planning, enhancing, and promoting trail activities. The ultimate goal is to share creative ideas with the nationwide trails community on ways that trails and greenways can be a more rewarding part of our way of life.

Moderator: Stuart Macdonald, American Trails website editor

Speakers: Bob Searns, Chair, American Trails Board, Kenneth W. Harris, Chairman, The Consilience Group LLC

ACCESSIBILITY, SUSTAINABILITY & SUCCESS – GO HAND IN HAND
Pope Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

Creating sustainable trails within urban natural areas can increase visitation, decrease impacts on natural resources and protect these special areas by discouraging undesirable uses. From their experience developing a trails master plan for Hidden Valley Park in Kansas City, John and Jimmi will discuss how a commitment to accessibility, sustainability and community involvement resulted in a plan that will enable the diverse neighboring populations to enjoy unique outdoor experiences and provide access to a unique ecosystem while protecting the area. They will cover how to approach accessibility, protect sensitive areas, involve the local community and empower trail-building volunteers through training and organizational support.

Moderator: Attila Bality, Outdoor Recreation Planner, National Park Service Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance

Speakers: John Royster, RLA, is president of Big Muddy Workshop, Inc; Jimmi Lossing, RLA, Landscape Architect, Kansas City Parks and Recreation

THE PAYOFF OF TRAILS: HOW TRAILS INCREASE THE ECONOMIC VITALITY OF COMMUNITIES
Download PowerPoint presentation (pdf 1.6 mb)
Fulton Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

Hear how research projects support the facts that trails do provide a positive economic benefit in their communities. Multiple case studies in non-metropolitan areas across the nation show how trails have become a centralizing component of a region’s revitalization. Learn about two more communities, one rural and the other urban, where trail users were surveyed to compare the user characteristics and spending patterns at a rural "destination" trail and a suburban "day use" trail. The results will provide participants with new support that proves “If you build it... They will come and spend!’

Moderator: Mary Hanson, Outdoor Recreation Planner, Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance, National Park Service

Speakers: Carl Knoch, Manager of Trail Development Rails to Trails Conservancy, Northeast Regional Office; David Lindahl, Principal, Morton Trails; John Morton, Founder and Principle, Morton Trails

TRIMMING THE FATT IN ARKANSAS – A WILL AND A WAY!
White Oak Room (Peabody Hotel)

This session will address issues relating to reducing the high cost of public bid construction by bringing services and trail construction in house and creating nontraditional partnerships to maximize limited resources. Featured trails will include the Arkansas River Trail system in Little Rock and the Scull Creek Trail system in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The session will also illustrate the importance of creating spine trails in urban areas and look specifically at the diverse range of issues needed to overcome constructing trails through some of the most expensive land in Arkansas.

Moderator: Terry Eastin, Co-Chair, 2008 National Trails Symposium and Arkansas River Trail Consultant.

Speakers: Matt Mihalevich, Trails Coordinator, City of Fayetteville, Arkansas; Terry Eastin, Co-Chair, 2008 National Trails Symposium and Arkansas River Trail Consultant.

TUESDAY NOVEMBER 18
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

Feet First: Knitting Trails Into A Diverse Land Use Tapestry in NW Indiana and Mammoth Lakes CA
White Oak Room (Peabody Hotel)

Northwest Indiana is one of the most diverse land use geographies in the country from decayed urban core to vast acreages of farmland. Knitting together this diversity is a trail completed network of just over 80 miles, part of a vision of 500 miles of trails. Spearheading these initiatives is the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission through recently adopted plans buttressing both land and water-trail visions that link together region residents to these diverse land uses. The Mammoth Lakes, CA Trails Master Plan, involved a new trails and public access advocacy group, Town government, and the US Forest Service in a comprehensive planning effort to promote the “feet first” mobility that forms the basis of the local economy.

Moderator: Kay Lloyd, American Trails Board Member

Speakers: Mitch Barloga, Non-Motorized Transportation and Greenways Planner for the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission; Jeff Olson Principal, Alta Planning + Design

DIFFICULT TRAILS IN DIFFICULT PLACES
Download PowerPoint presentation
(pdf 9.4 mb)
Miller Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

This presentation will reveal the process of planning, designing and constructing trails within four different landscape settings identifying challenges and solutions. Four case studies will be discussed; an urbanized trail corridor adjacent to a historic downtown; a regional trail along an industrialized and neglected creek corridor; a regional trail along a pristine mountain river; retrofitting an urban trail within a constrained major drainageway corridor. Each case study will: Demonstrate innovative trail planning when working with public agencies and the community. Explore difficult sites, the construction solutions and techniques to make successful trails. Implement good and sustainable practices in trail design. 

Moderator: Lynn Warren, Arkansas State Parks

Speakers: Mark Wilcox, ASLA, RLA, Vice President, DHM Design Corporation; Bill Neumann, ASLA, Leed AP, RLA, Vice President, DHM Design Corporation; John M. Pflaum, P.E./Project Manager, WHPacific, Inc.

TRAINING AND RESOURCES FOR BUILDING BETTER TRAILS
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on Outdoor Stewardship Institute (pdf 692 kb)
Caraway II & III (Statehouse Convention Center)

Better training and skills help build more sustainable trails, empower volunteers to be more effective, and help youth develop careers and confidence. This session will present educational opportunities, training providers, and a wide range of resources for trails and greenways. Efforts of the National Trails Training Partnership, the Outdoor Stewardship Institute, and American Trails will be emphasized, along with BLM's survey of skills for national scenic and historic trails. Learn about trail training services and opportunities plus a wide variety of technical resources available. Join us in sharing ideas as well as needs for trails training, improving cooperation, and building skills.

Moderator: Stuart Macdonald, Program Manager, National Trails Training Partnership

Speakers: Bob Finch, Executive Director, Outdoor Stewardship Institute; Alex Weiss, Greenways & Trails Coordinator; Florida Office of Greenways & Trails; Mike Brown, BLM, National Training Center

ICING ON THE CAKE! MISSISSIPPI RIVER TRAIL CENTENNIAL PARTNERSHIP CREATES PATHWAYS FOR CONNECTING COMMUNITIES WITH FEDERAL, STATE, REGIONAL, AND MUNICIPAL PARKS
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on Great Rivers Greenway Linkages (pdf 692 kb)
Izard Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

This presentation is designed to illustrate how diverse multi-state, mutli-region partnerships benefit trail and greenway development and bring new connections and opportunities to diverse partners and organizations whose missions, while different, compliment one another.

Moderator: Terry Eastin, Executive Director, Mississippi River Trail

Speakers: Terry Eastin, Executive Director, Mississippi River Trail; Todd Antoine, AICP, Deputy Director of Planning – Great Rivers Greenway District; Paul Labovitz, Superintendent, Mississippi National River and Recreation Area

SUSTAINABLE MOUNTAIN TRAILS – EAGLE CLIFF TRAIL SYSTEM CASE STUDY, ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK, COLORADO
Fulton Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

This presentation will convey sustainability principles and processes according to the NPS’ recently published Guide to Sustainable Mountain Trails, Assessment, Planning & Design Sketchbook. The purpose is to show an interdisciplinary team on a current National Park Service project where the sustainability variables of ecosystems, elevation, climate, soils, cross-slopes, resource protection issues and user characteristics can develop a corridor plan to implement over several seasons. This case study was developed through a series of training curricula and classes initiated by the Outdoor Stewardship Institute, a program of Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado.

Moderator: Hugh Duffy, Project Manager, National Park Service

Speakers: Hugh Duffy, Project Manager, National Park Service; Danny Basch, Eastside Trails Crew Foreman, Rocky Mountain National Park

NATURAL RESOURCE MONITORING THROUGH TRAIL DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT
Chicot Room (Peabody Hotel)

Join a panel discussion that explores how environmental protection can be a natural result of inspired and creative trail development and management. Our case studies include an Equestrian Trail system in the Shawnee National Forest of southern Illinois, which resulted in the use of a trail as the preferred means of balancing equestrian usage and environmental protection. We will also explore how the massive task of developing a permanently protected trail corridor for the Appalachian Trail has resulted in the development of a far-reaching and complex program called the Appalachian Trail MEGA-Transect. Ride along on this journey of change, and see how trails can change not only attitudes, but the footprint of man and horse as well.

Moderator: Michael Passo, American Trails Board, Chief Executive Otter, Elakah Expeditions LLC

Speakers: Brian Bourne, USDA Forest Service, Region 9, Shawnee National Forest, Hidden Springs Ranger District; Roger Moore, Associate Professor of Parks Recreation and Tourism at North Carolina State University

PRESERVING OUR NATION’S HISTORIC TRAILS: TRAIL TURTLES, RUT NUTS, CONTRACTORS, AND BUREAUCRATS
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(pdf 2.6 mb)
Harris Brake Room (Peabody Hotel)

This panel presentation describes the cooperative efforts of a trail mix of organization volunteers, contractors, and agencies, including the latest processes and techniques used in protecting and preserving the crown jewels of the National Trails System - renowned congressionally designated national historic trails such as the Oregon Trail, California Trail, and the Juan Bautista de Anza. How does one protect thousands of miles of pristine trail landscape, while demands for communication towers, energy development, and other uses escalate? Learn about mapping, marking, and monitoring, classifying historic trails, documenting historic integrity, determining historic settings, applying viewshed analyses, and using visual simulation to hide modern intrusions.

Speakers: Gary Werner, Executive Director, Partnership for the National Trails System; Cheryl Blanchard, Archaeologist, U.S. Bureau of Land Management; Dave Welch, Preservation Officer, Oregon-California Trails Association; Gary Long, OTAK, Inc.

CREATING THE TRAILS THAT USERS WANT SO YOU DON'T GET THE TRAILS YOU DON'T WANT
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on Minnesota DNR Trail Case Studies (pdf 9.3 mb)
Pope Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

A team of experts from a State Federal agency as well as from a Trail User group will help you to understand how to build fun and sustainable trails in a way that will help to curtail off-trail travel. The session will help you to understand what trail users are seeking so that you may help to fulfill those needs. It will include case studies of what works, best practices and techniques of building the correct type of trails, and information regarding the creation and maintenance of sustainable trail systems.

Moderator: Karen Umphress, Project Coordinator, National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council and American Trails Board Member

Speakers: Forrest Boe, Director, Trails and Waterways Division, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; Cam Lockwood, Enterprise Team Leader, Trails Unlimited an Enterprise Group of the US Forest Service; Jack Terrell, Senior Project Coordinator, National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council

A PATH TO REMEMBER: DESIGNING TRAILS WITH ART AND HISTORY
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on Grand River Arts Walk (pdf 3.1 mb)
Conway Room (Peabody Hotel)

Sensitive trail design can promote an awareness of industrial, cultural, environmental, and historic heritage. Many trails interface with sites that provide opportunities to tell important stories, to reveal the landscape's history, and to convey a stronger sense of regional cultural identity. The real challenge is finding creative ways that truly inspire and connect with trail users in an information-saturated era. This session will highlight design development of the Urban Arts Leg of the City of Jackson’s (MI) Riverwalk Trail on the Grand River, complemented by a survey of several recent National Park Service trail projects that integrate public art.

Moderator: Charles Tracy, National Park Service Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance

Speakers: Charles Tracy, National Park Service Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance; Lori Singleton, ASLA, Associate, Lead Designer, Hamilton Anderson Associates

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18
Time: 10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

WATER TRAILS: HOW THEY WORK AND WHY THEY ARE AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE TRAILS COMMUNITY
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on What A Water Trail Can Do For You (pdf 9.3 mb)
Harris Brake Room (Peabody Hotel)

Successful water trails are the product of partnerships among a wide variety of public and private constituents. This session explores several ways in which water trails are uniquely positioned to: build community support that generates valuable outcomes for the trail and community; tap into partnerships that provide practical solutions to water trail design, access, camping, and restrooms; and choose a name that serves not only to describe the trail but also to engage the public.

Moderator: Jamie Mierau, Director of River Protection, American Rivers

Speakers: Jeff Duncan, Outdoor Recreation Planning, National Park Service Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance; Mary Crockett, Program Coordinator & River Manager for South Carolina Department of Natural Resouces

THE IMPACT OF TRAIL EVENTS - ALASKA TO TEXAS
White Oak Room (Peabody Hotel)

Organizing events on your trail can make a tremendous difference in gaining public awareness and support. Discover the fascinating history of Alaska's Iditarod National Historic Trail while learning the range of winter trail-based competitive events in Alaska and their relationship to community wellness, especially in rural communities. This session will also highlight how an annual 5K race on Dallas' Katy Trail has become a community celebration and made a local trail a fixture in the community. Learn now to integrate media to promote your event, leverage funding and market your event.

Moderator: Alison B. Bullock, Tennessee Projects Director, Rivers, Trails & Conservation Assistance, National Park Service

Speakers: Kevin Keeler, Administrator, Iditarod National Historic Trail; Betsy Edmond, Associate Director-Membership & Development Friends of the Katy Trail

BUILDING PARTNERSHIPS FOR SINGLE AND MULTI-USE TRAILS ; TRANSFERING HYSTERIA TO HARMONY USING COLLABORATIVE APPROACHES AND COMBINED INTERAGENCY PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT STRATEGIES
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on Chippewa Area Partnerships (pdf 9.3 mb)
Chicot Room (Peabody Hotel)

What uses are appropriate on thousands of miles of roads, trails, and other routes? Learn about collaborative travel management planning efforts that work. Too often travel management and trail planning is a competitive process that polarizes users, public and private land managers, and various agencies. A collaborative approach, open to meaningful public participation can result in a travel management plan that is widely acceptable to all partners. In this session we will learn how these planning tools are being applied in the 2 million acre area around the Chippewa National Forest in Minnesota and the 84 year old Memorial Park Trail System in Houston, TX.

Moderator: Helen Koehler, President, FL Greenways and Trails Foundation

Speakers:Jay Daniel, Superintendent, Houston Parks and Recreation Department, Greenspace Management Memorial Region-Central Division; Jack Olson, Trail Planner, Minnesota Dept. of Natural Resources

INTERPRETATION MAKES A TRAIL MORE THAN A WALK IN THE PARK
Conway Room (Peabody Hotel)

Trails bring the user close to the resource in a way nothing else does. The resource speaks – but in different voices to each person depending upon the person’s knowledge and experience. Interpretation clarifies the land’s message, set historical facts straight, and can express the value of the land and of the trail. Interpretation ‘reveals meanings and relationships,’ and ‘forges emotional and intellectual connections’ between the user and the land, and leads to awareness, caring, stewardship, and protection. This session will focus on the value of interpretation for trail projects and will explore innovation techniques used in the integration of interpretation into the design of trails as seen at the Cleveland Metroparks’ Ohio & Erie Canal Reservation.

Moderator: Lynn Warren, Arkansas State Parks

Speakers: Jay Miller, Administrator of Program Services, Arkansas State Parks: Nancy Desmond, Manager, CanalWay Visitor Center, Cleveland Metroparks

UNIQUE TRAILS IN CHALLENGING SITES.
Miller Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

Presentation of several projects depicting creative solutions and construction methods where challenging site conditions required innovative design resulting in incredible user experience outcomes. Features trails of White Rock Lake, Lady Bird Lake Trail & Boardwalk, Hot Springs Creek Greenway, Lake Fayetteville, Papago Green Line and more. The impact of trails in neighborhoods as a public use component as well as technical issues such as dealing with hydrology of sites, difficult terrain, and permits will be addressed.

Moderator: Sally Horsey, Landscape Architect, Jacobs Carter Burgess

Speakers: Phillip Neeley, Sr. Landscape Architect, Jacobs Carter Burgess; Mark Asher, Structural Engineer, Jacobs Carter Burgess; David Retzsch, Unit Manager, Urban Design & Planning, Jacobs Carter Burgess

NATIONAL RECREATION TRAILS: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE
Izard Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

This session will analyze the NRT program – what it is and what it can be in the future, particularly in light of the 40th NTS anniversary. This session will also highlight how some trails have successfully used the NRT designation to advance their goals and become a recognized resource in their communities.

Moderator: Rick Potts, Chief, Conservation and Outdoor Recreation, National Park Service

Speakers: Stuart Macdonald, American Trails Magazine and website editor; Nathan Caldwell, Trails, Byways, Transportation Enhancements, and Alternative Transportation Coordinator, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; National Recreation Trails Coordinator, National Park Service

DOGS GONE WILD
Download PowerPoint presentation (pdf 2.1 mb)
Grampas Room (Peabody Hotel)

Dogs, trails & open space are the topic of discussion, highlighted by the dog use policy of the 125 mile Ridge to Rivers Trail System, an urban/rural interface of a rapidly growing community. Boise, ID, needed to know “What is the best way to negate the impacts dogs are having to resources on the heavily used trail system?” Learn about the process for reviewing/revising current trail policy, dealing with resource management where trails cross numerous ownerships (municipal, private, state and federal), building off leash areas, fostering responsible dog ownership through educated citizens and the partnerships formed for providing these solutions.

Moderator: Diane Banta, Outdoor Recreation Planner, National Park Service, Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance

Speaker: Julia Kertz Grant, Boise City Foothills and Open Space Manager

TEXAS TWO STEP OR ZYDECO JIG: PRESERVING FLOODWAYS, PROMOTING FITNESS AND PROVIDING ALTERNATIVE TRANSIT OPTIONS IN TEXAS AND LOUISIANA
Download PowerPoint presentation (pdf 508 kb)
Fulton Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

This session will focus on addressing the challenges of coordinating with multiple agencies for shared use of space in floodplains. We'll discuss development of levee top trails in New Orleans, Louisiana and the aquitsition of land along 3 major urban waterways to construct approximately 50 miles of trails in San Antonio, Texas. Learn how New Orleans has brought together disparate partners and created a model of levee top path development. Learn how San Antonio's Greenways Program is reaching a wide range of cultures and lifestyles through it's marketing effort for the trails and natural beauty of San Antonio's waterways.

Moderator: Liz Smith-Incer, National Park Service Rivers, Trails & Conservation Assistance Program - Mississippi Field Office, Ocean Springs, MS

Speakers: Dan Jatres, Program Manager, Regional Planning Commission, New Orleans, LA; Brandon Ross, Projects Manager, City of San Antonio Parks and Recreation, San Antonio, TX

DON'T OPEN YOUR SHOW ON BROADWAY
Download PowerPoint presentation (ppt 264 kb)
Pope Room (Statehouse Convention Center)

The presentation will be a basic sales skills training session tailored for trails advocates. The purpose will be to teach those who must “sell” their trails project the skills that a professional sales person would use in obtaining agreement on the features and benefits of trails. This will convey useful strategies. For example it will discuss why you don’t prepare a big presentation for funding and immediately take it to your most important prospect first. Thus, the title of the presentation.
   
Moderator: Terry Whaley, Ozark Greenways

Speaker: Ron Carter, Executive Director, The Greenways Foundation

VOLUNTEER STEWARDSHIP PLANNING AND INTERGRATING YOUTH AND TRAILS
Caraway II & III (Statehouse Convention Center)

Increasingly public land management agencies must rely on volunteers to provide the labor and expertise for trail construction and maintenance projects. Bob Finch will introduce you to Volunteer Stewardship Planning, a new proactive approach to planning stewardship projects where volunteers and agency staff work together to develop Volunteer Stewardship Action Plans (VSAPs). Justin Kenney will share lessons learned over the 23-years the Vermont Youth Conservation Corps has partnered youth with local, state and federal entities to complete high priority conservation projects around the state of Vermont - what is being done to increase youth involvement, what impact this model has had on youth and the environment, and what options are available in the coming years.

Moderator: Krystal Fleeger, Park Ranger, San Antonio Missions National Historic Park

Speakers: Justin Kenney, Program Coordinator, Vermont Youth Conservation Corps: Bob Finch, Director of the Outdoor Stewardship Institute, Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado

Read bios of the many Symposium speakers and presenters...

 

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Quad Cities 2006
Austin 2004
Chattanooga 2010

2006 Awards
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The "Medical Mile" project

Art and Health on the Medical Mile

More photos: Cool Trail Solutions

The "Big Dam Bridge" project

Little Rock's Arkansas River Trail

Arkansas conquers a trails funding crisis

Little Rock Parks & Recreation

The Mississippi River Trail

Arkansas Trails page

Ozark-St. Francis National Forests

Ouachita National Forest

 

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